J Knee Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1600087
Erratum
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Erratum: The Relationship between Body Mass Index and Risk of Failure following Meniscus Repair

Mark F. Sommerfeldt
1  Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
,
Robert A. Magnussen
1  Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
,
Kyle L. Randall
2  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Avita Health System, Ontario, Ohio
,
Marc Tompkins
3  Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
,
Bryan Perkins
4  College of Medicine, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska
,
Avijit Sharma
1  Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
,
Ryan Blackwell
1  Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
,
David C. Flanigan
1  Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
09 March 2017 (eFirst)

It has been brought to our attention that the abstract of the above article published in the Journal of Knee Surgery, Volume 29, Number 8, 2016 (DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1569480) is incorrect. The correct abstract is as follows:

Abstract

It is unknown whether body mass index (BMI) influences outcomes of meniscus repair. We hypothesized that increased BMI would be associated with increased risk of failure. A retrospective study was performed involving patients who had undergone meniscus repair between 2008 and 2012. Chart review and phone interviews were conducted to determine which patients required additional surgery. Patients were categorized as normal BMI (<25) or increased BMI (≥25). Of the 551 patients who met study criteria, 410 (74.4%) were available for follow-up at a mean of 19 months postoperatively. One hundred and ninety-eight patients (49.3%) had a BMI <25 and 212 (51.7%) patients had a BMI ≥25. Fifty-six patients (13.7%) required further surgery for a repair failure. Failure occurred in 32 patients (16.2%) in the normal BMI group and 24 patients (11.3%) in the increased BMI group (p = 0.20). Logistic regression modeling demonstrated no difference in the odds of repair failure with BMI of 25 or greater compared with normal BMI (odds ratio: 0.62; 95% confidence interval: 0.34–1.15; p = 0.13), Patients with a BMI ≥25 did not have a higher risk of meniscus repair failure relative to those with a BMI <25. Given these findings, surgeons should not consider moderately increased BMI as a contraindication to meniscal repair.


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