Am J Perinatol 2017; 34(09): 845-850
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1598255
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

The Effect of Birth Order on Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality in Very Preterm Twins

Elad Mei-Dan
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, North York General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
,
Jyotsna Shah
3  Department of Paediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
4  Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
,
Shoo Lee
3  Department of Paediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
4  Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
5  Department of Neonatology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Maternal-Infant Care (MiCare) Research Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
,
Prakesh S. Shah
3  Department of Paediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
4  Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
5  Department of Neonatology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Maternal-Infant Care (MiCare) Research Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
,
Kellie E. Murphy
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
5  Department of Neonatology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Maternal-Infant Care (MiCare) Research Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
6  Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
,
for the Canadian Neonatal Network Investigators› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

18 October 2016

05 January 2017

Publication Date:
23 February 2017 (online)

Abstract

Objective  This retrospective cohort study examined the effect of birth order on neonatal morbidity and mortality in very preterm twins.

Study Design Using 2005 to 2012 data from the Canadian Neonatal Network, very preterm twins born between 24 0/7 and 32 6/7 weeks of gestation were included. Odds of morbidity and mortality of second-born cotwins compared with first-born cotwins were examined by matched-pair analysis. Outcomes were neonatal death, severe brain injury (intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3 or 4 or persistent periventricular echogenicity), bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) (> stage 2), necrotizing enterocolitis (≥ stage 2), and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Multivariable analysis was performed adjusting for confounders.

Result There were 6,636 twins (3,318 pairs) included with a mean gestational age (GA) of 28.9 weeks. A higher rate of small for GA occurred in second-born twins (10 vs. 6%). Mortality was significantly lower for second-born twins (4.3 vs. 5.3%; adjusted odds ratio: 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59–0.95). RDS (66 vs. 60%; adjusted odds ratio: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.29–1.52) and severe retinopathy (9 vs. 7%; adjusted odds ratio: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.07–2.01) were significantly higher in second-born twins.

Conclusion Thus, while second-born twins had reduced odds of mortality, they also had increased odds of RDS and ROP.

Note

List of CNN Site Investigators: Prakesh S. Shah, MD, MSc (Director, Canadian Neonatal Network and site investigator), Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario; Adele Harrison, MD, MBChB, Victoria General Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia; Anne Synnes, MDCM, MHSC, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia; Todd Sokoran, MD, Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, British Columbia and Surrey Memorial Hospital, Surrey, British Columbia; Wendy Yee, MD, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, Alberta; Khalid Aziz, MBBS, MA, MEd, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta; Zarin Kalapesi, MD, Regina General Hospital, Regina, Saskatchewan; Koravangattu Sankaran, MD, MBBS, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Mary Seshia, MBChB, Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Ruben Alvaro, MD, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Sandesh Shivananda, MBBS, MD, DM, Hamilton Health Sciences Centre, Hamilton, Ontario; Orlando Da Silva, MD, MSc, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario; Chuks Nwaesei, MD, Windsor Regional Hospital, Windsor, Ontario; Kyong-Soon Lee, MD, MSc, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario; Michael Dunn, MD, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario; Nicole Rouvinez-Bouali, MD, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and Ottawa General Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario; Kimberly Dow, MD, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario; Ermelinda Pelausa, MD, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec; Keith Barrington, MBChB, Hôpital Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Québec; Christine Drolet, MD, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Sainte Foy Québec; Patricia Riley, MD, MDCM, BSc, Montréal Children's Hospital, Montréal, Québec and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Québec; Valerie Bertelle, MD, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec; Rody Canning, MD, Moncton Hospital, Moncton, New Brunswick; Barbara Bulleid, MD, Dr. Everett Chalmers Hospital, Fredericton, New Brunswick; Cecil Ojah, MBBS, and Luis Monterrosa, MD, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick; Akhil Deshpandey, MD, MBBS, Janeway Children's Health and Rehabilitation Centre, St. John's, Newfoundland; Jehier Afifi, MB BCh, MSc, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia; Andrzej Kajetanowicz, MD, Cape Breton Regional Hospital, Sydney, Nova Scotia; Shoo K. Lee, MBBS, PhD (chairman, Canadian Neonatal Network), Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.