Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37(06): 839-854
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1592075
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the Asia-Pacific Region

Jae-Hoon Song
1  Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
2  Asia-Pacific Foundation for Infectious Diseases, Seoul, Korea
,
Kyungmin Huh
3  Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam, Korea
,
Doo Ryeon Chung
1  Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
2  Asia-Pacific Foundation for Infectious Diseases, Seoul, Korea
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
13 December 2016 (online)

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Aging population, dense urbanization, and poor access to health care make the Asia-Pacific region vulnerable to CAP. The high incidence of CAP poses a significant health and economic burden in this region. Common etiologic agents in other global regions including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and respiratory viruses are also the most prevalent pathogens in the Asia-Pacific region. But the higher incidence of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei are unique to the region. The high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae has been raising the need for more prudent use of antibiotics. Emergence and spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus deserve attention, while the risk has not reached significant level yet in cases of CAP. Given a clinical and socioeconomic importance of CAP, further effort to better understand the epidemiology and impact of CAP is warranted in the Asia-Pacific region.

Funding

This study was partly supported by a grant from the Korean Health Technology R&D Project, Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (Grant No. HI12C0756), and partly by the Asia Pacific Foundation for Infectious Diseases.