Am J Perinatol 2017; 34(01): 01-07
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1584150
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Viral Infections in Neonates with Suspected Late-Onset Bacterial Sepsis—A Prospective Cohort Study

André Kidszun
1  Department of Neonatology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Lena Klein
1  Department of Neonatology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Julia Winter
1  Department of Neonatology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Isabella Schmeh
1  Department of Neonatology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Britta Gröndahl
2  Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Stephan Gehring
2  Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Markus Knuf
1  Department of Neonatology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
3  Children's Hospital, Dr. Horst Schmidt Klinik, Ludwig-Erhard-Strasse, Wiesbaden, Germany
,
Kerstin Weise
4  Institute for Virology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Eva Mildenberger
1  Department of Neonatology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

05 January 2016

21 March 2016

Publication Date:
16 May 2016 (online)

Abstract

Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the occurrence of viral infections in infants with suspected late-onset bacterial sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit.

Methods In a prospective study, infants with suspected late-onset bacterial sepsis underwent viral testing alongside routine blood culture sampling. Using a multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed for adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus A and B, H1N1 virus, parainfluenza virus 1 to 4, metapneumovirus, coronavirus, and picornavirus. Stools were examined for adenovirus, rotavirus, norovirus, and enterovirus.

Results Between August 2010 and March 2014, data of 88 infants with 137 episodes of suspected late-onset bacterial sepsis were analyzed. Six infants were diagnosed with a respiratory viral infection (2 × RSV, 4 × picornavirus). Blood culture–proven bacterial sepsis was detected in 15 infants. Neither viral–bacterial coinfections nor polymerase chain reaction positive stool samples were found.

Conclusion Respiratory viruses can be detected in a considerable number of neonates with suspected late-onset bacterial sepsis. In contrast, gastrointestinal viral or enterovirus infections appear uncommon in such cases.

Note

The main results of the present study have been orally presented at the 5th International Conference on Clinical Neonatology (Torino, Italy, September 11–13, 2014).[27]