J Knee Surg 2015; 28(05): 382-389
DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1551832
Special Focus Section
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

The Role of All-Polyethylene Tibial Components in Modern TKA

James Doran
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center's Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York
,
Stephen Yu
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center's Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York
,
Daniel Smith
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center's Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York
,
Richard Iorio
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center's Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

26 February 2015

11 March 2015

Publication Date:
18 June 2015 (online)

Abstract

In the modern era of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), a majority of orthopedic surgeons utilize metal-backed tibial (MBT) components rather than nonmodular designs, such as all-polyethylene tibial (APT) components. Interestingly, current clinical evidence does not explain this disproportionate practice by surgeons. The shift in surgeon preference from APT to MBT components occurred in the 1980s following unfavorable results from early studies with APT. However, results from current studies that have revisited the APT versus MBT component comparison demonstrate similar implant survivorship and patient outcomes. Despite equivalent survivorship and improved cost-efficiency, APT components have not achieved equivalent utilization rates with MBT. This review of the current literature, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of APT components, will outline a rationale for the role of APT components in today's cost-driven, outcomes-oriented, patient-centered health-care system.