J Knee Surg 2015; 28(03): 183-190
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1373740
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Can Cementing Technique Reduce the Cost of a Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty?

Aditya V. Maheshwari
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
,
Mayank Argawal
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
,
Qais Naziri
2   Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Robert Pivec
1   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
,
Michael A. Mont
2   Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland
,
Vijay J. Rasquinha
3   Department of Orthopaedics, North Shore LIJ/Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, New York
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

14 January 2014

11 February 2014

Publication Date:
21 April 2014 (online)

Abstract

Studies on cost containment of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have generated substantial interest over the past decade. Although multiple studies have evaluated the various intraoperative methods to control cost, no prior study has evaluated the economic impact and the clinical outcome based on amount of bone cement needed for a primary TKA. At a minimum of 3 years follow-up, we observed no difference in implant survivorship or Knee Society scores, but did observe substantial cost savings when one versus two packets of bone cement were used in combination with a hand mixing technique. By eliminating several extra cement mixing products, we achieved an approximately $1,000 cost saving per case with no difference in clinical outcomes at midterm follow-up.