Amer J Perinatol 2014; 31(11): 957-964
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1372422
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Bakri Balloon in the Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage: A Review

Cara E. Wright
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia
,
Suneet P. Chauhan
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia
,
Alfred Z. Abuhamad
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

22 October 2013

27 December 2013

Publication Date:
04 April 2014 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective The purpose of this review is to ascertain the indications, techniques, and the associated morbidity with the use of Bakri balloon.

Material and Methods A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted from 2001 to 2013. We calculated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for complications.

Results We identified 12 publications that met the inclusion criteria. Four reports provided the frequency of Bakri use during the study period, with the overall rate being 0.20% (138/69, 174; 95% CI, 0.17–0.25%). Two-thirds of use followed cesarean delivery (67%; 182/273). Uterine atony was specified as the underlying etiology of postpartum hemorrhage in 75% (9/12) of publication. The rate of balloon displacement was 10% (95% CI, 6–16%) and need for transfusion, 43% (95% CI, 32–55%). Hysterectomy was undertaken in 6% (95% CI, 4–10%).

Conclusions There is a paucity of publications on Bakri balloon. Before its utilization is recommended in guidelines, a randomized clinical trial comparing uterotonics alone versus with balloon is warranted.

Note

This study was presented at the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2013 Annual Meeting at Napa, California, October 16–19, 2013.