Amer J Perinatol 2014; 31(09): 735-740
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1359720
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

The Effects of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression during Cesarean Delivery on Fibrinolysis

Keisha L. B. Reddick
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Michael P. Smrtka
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Chad A. Grotegut
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Andra H. James
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia
,
Leo R. Brancazio
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Geeta K. Swamy
1  Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

22 August 2013

04 September 2013

Publication Date:
11 December 2013 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective Pregnancy is associated with increased risk for thromboembolic events. Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices are the method of thromboprophylaxis in a nonpregnant population. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IPC on markers of fibrinolysis during cesarean delivery.

Study Design We conducted a randomized controlled trial from April 2009 to March 2010 of women undergoing scheduled elective cesarean delivery. Forty-nine women were randomized to IPCs or usual care. All participants had three blood samples obtained: (1) baseline, (2) 1 hour after randomization, and (3) 30 minutes after cesarean delivery. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) levels were analyzed in each sample using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures two-way analysis of variance with α = 0.05.

Results There was a time-dependent change in tPA, uPA, and PAI-1 levels following delivery but no difference in TAT and PAI-2 levels with time. There were no differences between women randomized to IPCs or usual care.

Conclusion Markers of fibrinolysis were not significantly altered by IPCs in this study of low-risk pregnant women. Further research regarding the mechanism and efficacy of IPCs in pregnant women is warranted.