Amer J Perinatol 2013; 30(05): 383-388
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1326981
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Prevalence of Group B Streptococcus Colonization in Subsequent Pregnancies of Group B Streptococcus–Colonized versus Noncolonized Women

Sarah M. Page-Ramsey
1  Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, Wright Patterson Medical Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland
,
Sara K. Johnstone
1  Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, Wright Patterson Medical Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
,
David Kim
1  Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, Wright Patterson Medical Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
,
Patrick S. Ramsey
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

13 November 2011

24 May 2012

Publication Date:
21 September 2012 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective To determine whether group B Streptococcus (GBS)-colonized pregnant women have an increased prevalence of GBS colonization in subsequent pregnancies.

Study Design This retrospective cohort study compared the prevalence of GBS colonization in initial and subsequent pregnancies of 158 women with two or more deliveries at a Midwest institution since the initiation of universal screening for GBS.

Results The GBS colonization rate in index pregnancies was 20%. Colonization rate in subsequent pregnancies for initially GBS-colonized women was 42% compared with 19% for women who were not colonized with GBS in the index pregnancy (p = 0.009). The relative risk for GBS-colonized women to be GBS-colonized in subsequent pregnancies was 2.2 (confidence interval = 1.3 to 3.8).

Conclusion Previous GBS colonization is a risk factor for GBS colonization in subsequent pregnancies. Consideration of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis in women with a history of GBS colonization, assuming current colonization status is unknown, warrants further investigation.

Note

Presented at the Armed Forces District Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Norfolk, VA, October 15, 2008