Amer J Perinatol 2011; 28(7): 509-514
DOI: 10.1055/s-0031-1272965
© Thieme Medical Publishers

Marinobufagenin Levels in Preeclamptic Patients: A Preliminary Report

Enoch Agunanne1 , Darijana Horvat1 , Recherael Harrison1 , M. Nasir Uddin1 , Richard Jones2 , Thomas J. Kuehl2 , Daad Abi Ghanem3 , Luc R. Berghman3 , Xinzhong Lai4 , Jing Li4 , 5 , Daniel Romo4 , 5 , Jules B. Puschett1
  • 1The Nephrology/Hypertension Division, Department of Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Scott & White, Temple
  • 2The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Scott & White, Temple
  • 3The Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
  • 4The Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
  • 5The Natural Products LINCHPIN Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
04 March 2011 (eFirst)

ABSTRACT

Preeclampsia is a disorder resulting in significant fetomaternal complications with no definitive pharmacological intervention. A bufadienolide, marinobufagenin, has been implicated in the etiology of preeclampsia. We investigated both the blood and urine levels of marinobufagenin in preeclamptic and control subjects. Preeclamptic and normotensive pregnant women were recruited at various gestational age periods. Blood and urine specimens were obtained and analyzed for marinobufagenin levels and creatinine. The former determination was performed utilizing a new, novel chemifluorescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The marinobufagenin levels were higher in preeclamptics than in the controls in both serum and urine at various gestational age periods. Additionally, the mean level of marinobufagenin in the preeclamptic group was significantly greater than in controls in both blood and urine specimens (p < 0.05). These data are consistent with a role for marinobufagenin in the etiology of preeclampsia. This study demonstrated comparable results in blood and urine samples. This suggests that subsequent studies on levels of marinobufagenin as a screening test for preeclampsia could be done utilizing urine samples, which are easier to obtain, less invasive, more cost-effective, and as accurate as the serological tests.