Int J Sports Med 2022; 43(04): 297-304
DOI: 10.1055/a-1506-3007
Review

Effects of Concurrent Training on 1RM and VO2 in Adults: Systematic Review with Meta-analysis

1   Physical Education Department, Universidade Estadual do Norte do Paraná, Jacarezinho, Brazil
2   Physical Education Department, Faculdade Estácio de Sá de Ourinhos, Ourinhos, Brazil
,
3   Laboratory of Biomechanics and Clinical Epidemiology, PAIFIT Research Group, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Brazil
,
4   Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Praha, Czech Republic
,
1   Physical Education Department, Universidade Estadual do Norte do Paraná, Jacarezinho, Brazil
2   Physical Education Department, Faculdade Estácio de Sá de Ourinhos, Ourinhos, Brazil
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

The purpose of this systematic review was to analyze the effects of concurrent training on one repetition maximum (1RM), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in healthy adults. The review followed PRISMA recommendations using randomized controlled trials in nine databases. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria, totaling a sample of 796 subjects to perform the meta-analysis. As result, concurrent training provides similar increases in 1RM as strength training for upper limbs (standardized mean difference [SMD]: 0.12; 95% IC: [−0.18; 0.41]; p=0.43) and for the lower limbs (SMD: −0.32; 95% IC: [−0.79; 0.15]; p=0.19). Similarly, no difference was found in the aerobic capacity between the concurrent training vs. aerobic training groups ([SMD – VO2max]: −0.19; 95% IC: [−0.71; 0.33]; p=0.48 and [SMD – VO2peak]: −0.24; 95% IC: [−0.57; 0.08]; p=0.14). Based on the results found, we can affirm that a) similar to strength training, concurrent training provides maximum strength development for upper and lower limbs; and b) cardiorespiratory capacity is not impaired by concurrent training in relation to aerobic training, demonstrating the compatibility of the two training sessions.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 27 August 2020

Accepted: 22 April 2021

Article published online:
12 October 2021

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