Pharmacopsychiatry
DOI: 10.1055/a-0960-9846
Review
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Hippocampal Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Aberrant Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity in Rodent Model Psychosis: a Selective Review

Julia C. Bartsch
1  Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
2  Institute of Physiology I, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster, Germany
,
Björn H. Schott
1  Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
3  Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany
4  Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medicine Göttingen, Germany
,
Joachim Behr
1  Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
5  Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, Brandenburg Medical School, Neuruppin, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 04 January 2019
revised 14 May 2019

accepted 11 June 2019

Publication Date:
01 August 2019 (online)

Abstract

Schizophrenia is a complex, heterogeneous psychiatric disorder that affects about 1% of the global population. Hippocampal dysfunction has been linked to both cognitive deficits and positive symptoms in schizophrenia. Here, we briefly review current findings on disrupted hippocampal processing from a clinical perspective before concentrating on preclinical studies of aberrant hippocampal synaptic plasticity using the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of psychosis and related findings from genetic models. Taken together, the results put the case for maladaptive hippocampal synaptic plasticity and its extrinsic connections as mechanistic underpinnings of cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.