Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2013; 73(6): 611-622
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1328660
GebFra Science
Review
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Isolated Loco-Regional Recurrence of Breast Cancer – Established and Innovative Therapy Concepts

Isoliertes lokales und lokoregionäres Rezidiv beim Mammakarzinom – bewährte und innovative Therapiekonzepte
E.-M. Grischke
1   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Tübingen, Tübingen
,
D. Wallwiener
1   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Tübingen, Tübingen
,
R. Souchon
2   Dept. of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Tübingen, Tübingen
,
T. Fehm
3   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf
,
C. R. Loehberg
4   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen
,
S. M. Jud
4   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen
,
M. P. Lux
4   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen
,
M. W. Beckmann
4   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen
,
S. P. Renner
4   Dept. of OB/Gyn, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Correspondence

Dr. Christian R. Loehberg, M. D.
University Hospital of Erlangen, Dept. of OB/Gyn
Universitätsstraße 21–23
91054 Erlangen

Publication History

received 11 February 2013
revised 12 March 2013

accepted 13 May 2013

Publication Date:
26 June 2013 (online)

 

Abstract

The incidence of isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer is between 2–20 %. It constitutes the most common type of breast cancer recurrence. In contrast to distant metastasis, a number of curative therapies are available to treat isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer. Screening for early detection and regular examinations as part of a recommended follow-up programme is important. If distant metastasis has been excluded, therapy for recurrence ideally consists of surgery with R0 resection margins. Radiotherapy is indicated after non-curative surgery (R1/R2) for local tumour control to improve the chances of curative surgery and as a palliative therapy for local control of symptoms in inoperable cancer, also in combination with hyperthermia and systemic therapy. There was previously some uncertainty concerning the benefit of systemic therapy after R0 resection and breast-conserving therapy and after previous mastectomy. If the recurrence is hormone-receptor positive, (repeat) endocrine systemic therapy is indicated for both constellations. If the hormone-receptor status is negative, the question whether repeat chemotherapy is indicated as an adjuvant therapy and whether it offers a benefit to patients was still controversially discussed. However, data from the CALOR trial presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in 2012 has now answered this question in favour of chemotherapy. These new findings will not merely have an impact on future therapy recommendations but also on the entire clinical management of isolated loco-regional recurrence.


#

Zusammenfassung

Das isolierte lokale Rezidiv und das lokoregionäre Rezidiv stellen mit einer Häufigkeit von 2–20 % die häufigsten Manifestationen bei Wiederauftreten eins Mammakarzinoms dar. Im Gegensatz zu einer Fernmetastasierung ist beim isolierten lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv des Mammakarzinoms ein kurativer Therapieansatz gegeben. Dieses ist der Grund für den Einsatz von Maßnahmen zur Früherkennung und der Festlegung der entsprechenden Untersuchungen in den empfohlenen Nachsorgeprogrammen. Therapeutisch ist in der Rezidivsituation eine operative Therapie mit einer R0-Resektion anzustreben, wenn eine Fernmetastasierung ausgeschlossen wurde. Indikationen zur Radiotherapie bestehen bei nicht kurativ möglicher operativer Therapie (R1/R2) zur lokalen Tumorkontrolle, zum Erhalt der Aussicht auf eine Kuration und bei Inoperabilität zur lokalen Symptomkontrolle in palliativer Intention, gegebenenfalls in Kombination mit Hyperthermie und systemischer Therapie. Unsicherheit bezüglich des Nutzens systemischer Therapien bestand bislang nach R0-Resektion nach brusterhaltender Therapie oder nach zuvor erfolgter Mastektomie. Bei Hormonrezeptorpositivität des Rezidivs ist bei beiden Konstellationen eine (erneute) endokrine Systemtherapie indiziert. Bei negativem Hormonrezeptorstatus war die Frage offen, inwieweit eine erneute Chemotherapie als adjuvante Maßnahme indiziert ist bzw. einen Benefit für die Patientin ergibt. Mit den Daten der CALOR-Studie, welche beim San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in 2012 vorgestellt wurde, kann diese Frage zugunsten einer Chemotherapie mittlerweile beantwortet werden. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass diese neuen Erkenntnisse nicht nur die weiteren Therapieempfehlungen beeinflussen werden, sondern auch das gesamte klinische Management des alleinigen lokalen bzw. lokoregionären Rezidivs.


#

Definition, Incidence and Prognosis for Loco-Regional Recurrence (Adapted from the German interdisciplinary S3 Guidelines for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Follow-up of Breast Cancer, 2012 [1])

Loco-regional recurrence is defined as:

  • recurrence of breast cancer in the ipsilateral breast,

  • at the ipsilateral chest wall including the skin above it,

  • in the regional axillary lymph nodes,

  • in the supra- and infraclavicular region,

  • along the internal mammary vessels.

Loco-regional recurrence can occur as an isolated cancer or in combination with distant metastasis in other organ systems [2], [3].

The incidence of local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy is 5–10 % (after 10 years). The mean 5-year survival rate is 65 % (45–79 %) [4]. Recurrence at the chest wall after mastectomy is reported to occur in 4 % (2–20 %) of cases (with additional recurrence in the supraclavicular fossa reported to occur in 34 % [5]); reported axillary recurrence rates are 1 % (0.1–8 %) [4], [6]. The reported 5-year survival rates for these patients are 50 % (24–78 %) and 55 % (31–77 %), respectively [4]. The reported incidence of loco-regional recurrences occurring simultaneously at different locations is 16 % (8–19 %); it is associated with a 5-year survival rate of 21 % (18–23 %) [7] ([Table 1]).

Table 1 Incidence of and prognosis for loco-regional recurrence in patients with breast cancer (adapted from the AGO [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie e. V.] Breast Guidelines Version 2013.1D).

Localisation

Incidence (%)

Overall 5-year survival (%)

Ipsilateral in-breast recurrence (post BCT + radiotherapy)

10 (2–20)

65 (45–79)

Chest wall (post mastectomy)

4 (2–20)

50 (24–78)

Additionally present in the supraclavicular fossa

34

49 (3-y. OS)

Axilla:

  • after axillary dissection

1 (0.1–8)

55 (31–77)

  • after SNB

1

93

Multiple localisations

16 (8–19)

21 (18–23)

Early detection of isolated loco-regional recurrence positively affects survival [8]. Regular follow-up examinations to confirm that the patient is tumour-free with no local or axillary recurrence are important. As many patients are regularly followed up, the therapy of loco-regional recurrence is predominantly curative (50–70 %) and only palliative in around 30 % of patients [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15]. [Table 2] lists the risk factors for developing loco-regional recurrence [8], [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21], [22], [23], [24], [25], [26], [27], [28], [29], [30].

Table 2 Risk factors for developing loco-regional recurrence after modified radical mastectomy (MRM) or breast-conserving therapy (BCT) (adapted from the AGO Breast Guidelines Version 2013.1D).

Young age

Positive microscopic margins

Omission of radiotherapy (if indicated as adjuvant therapy)

Extensive intraductal component

Vascular invasion

Triple negative and HER2+/HR-negative vs. HR-positive

Grading (G3 vs. G1)

Elevated proliferation markers (e.g. Ki67)

pT (> 2 vs. ≤ 2 cm)

pN (N1 vs. N0)

Number of affected lymph nodes

Medial tumour location (vs. central/lateral)

The course of disease and biological behaviour do not differ much between in-breast recurrence after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and local recurrence after modified radical mastectomy (MRM) [25], [31], [32], [33]. The primary prognostic and predictive factors ([Table 3]) such as tumour size [8], [34], the presence or absence of multifocal disease [8], localisation [27], [34], grading [35], and HER2 and hormone-receptor status [35], [36], [37], [38] are also applicable for local recurrence.

Table 3 Prognostic and predictive factors for loco-regional recurrence after MRM or BCT (adapted from the AGO Breast Guidelines Version 2013.1D).

Risk factors for further recurrence:

  • tumour size

  • multifocal disease

  • localisation

Risk factors for metastasis/survival:

  • early (< 2–3 years) vs. late recurrence

  • hemangiosis and/or lymphangiosis carcinomatosa/grading/ER-negative/narrow resection margins (if > 2 factors positive)

Predictive factors for therapy:

  • HER2 status

  • ER/PR status

It is important to differentiate between “early” (< 2–3 years) and “late” (> 2–3 years) local recurrence. “Early” recurrence is less amenable to curative therapy and is associated with higher rates of further recurrence and distant metastasis [8], [39], [40].

In individual cases, differentiating loco-regional recurrence from ipsilateral secondary cancer may be difficult [41]. Indications that the lesion may be a secondary cancer requiring the same curative treatment as primary breast cancer include:

  • long period of time has elapsed since primary cancer

  • different localisation in the breast

  • different tumour biology (hormone-receptor status, HER2 status, grading).

Initially, the treatment of loco-regional recurrence is local. In women with operable cancer, the goal is to achieve complete resection of the recurrence (i.e. with histologically tumour-free margins). Postoperative radiotherapy after excision can improve local tumour control [42].

Radiation therapy is the therapy of choice to treat inoperable cancer with no distant metastasis [42]. Because of the high risk of subsequent systemic progression, systemic therapy may also be considered in addition to local treatment of the recurrence (surgery and/or radiotherapy) [43], [44]. However, the impact of systemic chemotherapy on these types of cancer has not yet been confirmed in prospective randomised studies [38], [44], [45], [46], [47].


#

Surgical Therapy for Loco-Regional Recurrence of Breast Cancer (Adapted from the interdisciplinary S3 Guidelines for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Follow-up of Breast Cancer, 2012 [1])

In contrast to distant metastasis, treatment of clinically confirmed single loco-regional recurrence can be curative, but this requires an individualised approach.

The treatment of local recurrence consists of surgical resection. Mastectomy achieves the best tumour control [25]. Repeat breast-conserving surgery is a viable option in favourable circumstances such as DCIS, invasive carcinoma after a long recurrence-free period, no cancer affecting the skin or if the cancer is at a considerable distance from the location of the primary tumour [48], [49].

The incidence of loco-regional recurrence after mastectomy is reported to be 2–20 % [4]. Of these cases, around one third of cancers manifest only as loco-regional recurrence, followed by – in order of decreasing frequency – cancers of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, axillary cancers and multilocal occurrence in 10–30 % of cases [50], [51], [52].


#

Importance of Histological Testing with Biopsy of Tumour Tissue for Repeat Determination of Prognostic Parameters in Loco-Regional Recurrence of Breast Cancer

Histopathological work-up is the first step if there is a clinical suspicion of loco-regional recurrence, as it is also necessary to determine biologically relevant factors affecting prognosis, such as levels of the proliferation marker Ki-67, hormone receptor status and HER2/neu status [21], [53], [54], [55].

These factors may differ in loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer compared to the primary tumour [56]. In an overview [56] of 8 studies [57], [58], [59], [60], [61], [62], [63], [64] investigating hormone receptor and HER2 status in loco-regional recurrence, significant differences were found between the primary tumour and the recurrence (oestrogen receptor [ER]: 5.5–38.1 %; progesterone receptor [PR]: 11.8–34.9 %; and HER2 status: 1.1–16.7 %) with a mean value of 19.8 % (median = 13.4 %; n = 271) for ER, 27.1 % (median = 28.6 %; n = 242) for PR, and 6.6 % (median = 1.6 %; n = 177) for HER2 ([Table 4]).

Table 4 Differences in ER, PR and HER2 expression between the primary tumour and loco-regional recurrence (modification based on [56]).

Method

Difference in ER expression

Difference in PR expression

Difference in HER2 expression

References

IHC = immunohistochemistry, FISH/CISH = fluorescent/chromogenic in situ hybridization, DCA = dextran-coated charcoal assay

IHC/CISH

4/50 (8.0 %)

16/50 (32.0 %)

0/48 (0 %)

[57]

IHC/FISH

5/30 (16.7 %)

[59]

IHC/EIA

4/14 (28.6 %)

4/14 (28.6 %)

0/14 (0 %)

[64]

IHC

6/45 (13.0 %)

16/45 (42.0 %)

1/45 (2.0 %)

[61]

IHC

24/63 (38.1 %)

22/63 (34.9 %)

[62]

IHC

9/279 (3.2 %)

[58]

DCA

7/48 (15.0 %)

[60]

DCA

4/29 (13.8 %)

[63]

These differences could have been caused by postoperative adjuvant therapies such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy or endocrine therapy. In the study with the lowest differences in hormone receptor status, a cut-off of 1 % for ER/PR expression was selected [57]. This corresponds to current recommendations [54] and will lead, by definition, in there being more hormone receptor-positive breast cancers in future. It could also result in a decrease in differences with regard to the assessment of hormone receptor status between the primary tumour and the recurrence as, despite the clear decrease in hormone receptor expression in the recurrence (decreases in expression are more common), recurrences can still be classified as hormone receptor-positive. With the exception of the findings reported by Guarneri et al. [59] (16.7 %), the differences with regard to HER2 status between the primary tumour and the recurrence were minimal (1.1–2.0 %).


#

Importance of Differentiating between Loco-Regional Recurrence and Secondary Cancer

In individual cases, it may be difficult to differentiate loco-regional recurrence from ipsilateral secondary cancer [41]. While it is assumed that local recurrences originate from residual tumour cells, ipsilateral secondary cancers appear to be de novo breast cancers independently occurring in the same breast. This would mean that the tumour biology of this secondary cancer also differs from that of the primary tumour [65].

In many clinical studies investigating breast-conserving surgery to treat breast cancer, around 80 % of local recurrences were found near the site of the former primary tumour [66], [67], [68]. The findings of studies which attempted to differentiate between local recurrence and ipsilateral secondary cancer are often conflicting, but overall they report fewer cases of “true” local recurrences (50–70 %) and more ipsilateral secondary cancers [20], [40], [41], [49], [69], [70], [71], [72]. A possible explanation for this heterogeneous data could be differences in the criteria used to define local recurrence and ipsilateral secondary cancer [20], [40], [41], [49], [69], [70], [71], [72]. Most studies use the following criteria to differentiate between local recurrence and ipsilateral secondary cancer: histological type, grading, hormone receptor status and localisation. However, some studies also include parameters such as resection margins and cytological factors obtained from flow cytometry analysis (fluorescence-activated cell sorting, FACS) (summarised in [41]).

In most studies, the mean time to developing local recurrence was found to be shorter than the mean time to developing ipsilateral secondary cancer, and the overall prognosis for patients with loco-regional recurrence was reported to be poorer compared to patients with ipsilateral secondary cancer (summarised in [41]). However, it must be admitted that the use of differing criteria, as mentioned above, could be the cause of this heterogeneous data; more pathological and biomolecular investigations are needed to clarify these points [73].

It is important to differentiate between ipsilateral loco-regional recurrence and ipsilateral secondary cancer on the one hand and contralateral secondary cancer and cervical lymph node metastases and lymph node metastases of the contralateral internal mammary artery on the other.

Around 2–20 % of patients with breast cancer go on to develop contralateral secondary cancer (synchronous secondary primary cancer: shorter time to development; metachronous secondary primary cancer: longer time to development) [74], [75]; however there are still no standard definitions in the literature or in treatment recommendations. After a diagnosis of primary breast cancer, the annual risk for secondary primary cancer is 0.7–1.8 %, while the risk for patients with BRCA 1/2 mutations is 18–40 % [76], [77].

It is still unclear whether the prognosis is better for patients with loco-regional recurrence or for patients with contralateral secondary cancer. Recent studies have reported both better and poorer prognoses for contralateral secondary primary cancer compared to ipsilateral local recurrence [74], [78], [79].

Prognostic factors associated with contralateral secondary cancer include age, the period of time elapsed between cancer development, how the secondary cancer was detected, the adjuvant therapy used to treat the primary cancer, hormone receptor status (patients with hormone receptor-negative primary tumour have a 10-fold increased risk of developing a secondary hormone receptor-negative tumour) and the presence or absence of BRCA 1/2 mutation [74], [75], [76], [80], [81].

It is also unclear whether the contralateral secondary cancer should be treated like a new primary tumour (two individual cancers) and to what extent there is a biological link between the primary and the secondary cancer [20], [74].

As the biological properties of the recurrence or the secondary cancer but also of the primary tumour have a big impact on both prognosis and the choice of treatment, several recent studies have looked at different approaches to determine the precise pathobiology and pathogenesis of secondary cancers [75], [82]. While some studies use standard immunohistochemical parameters, the HUMARA clonality assay represents a modern approach to investigating whether two tumours are derived from the same progenitor cells. The assay uses PCR amplification of X-linked genes and examines X-chromosome inactivation patterns in the tumours of female patients to analyse the clonality of tumours [75].


#

Importance of Indications for Systemic Therapy to Treat Loco-Regional Recurrence of Breast Cancer

The benefit of endocrine systemic therapy as an adjuvant treatment for both pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive recurrence has been demonstrated in many studies [1], [43], [83], [84].

In contrast, there are currently no good data from controlled clinical trials on the survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy for recurrence. For this reason, neither the current version of the ESMO (European Society for Medical Oncology) Guideline [53], nor the NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) Guideline [85] nor the German S3 Guidelines [1] include any clear recommendations for chemotherapy to treat recurrence. This also applies to women with recurrence in the chest wall after mastectomy or with ipsilateral axillary recurrence [38], [45], [86], [87]. Systemic therapy is currently only indicated to reduce the size of the recurrence if R0 resection would otherwise not be possible or if the tumour would otherwise be inoperable. [38], [45], [86], [87], [88] ([Table 5]).

Table 5 Indications for systemic therapy in patients with loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer.

Tumour downstaging to achieve/optimise operability

After curative R0 resection

As a primary therapy to treat inoperable repeat recurrence and tumours not amenable to radiotherapy

In patients with concomitant visceral and/or ossary metastases

Where possible, after histological determination of hormone receptor and HER2 status

  • if the tumour is ER/PR-positive: endocrine therapy

  • if the tumour is HER2-positive: trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy

The benefits of antineoplastic systemic therapy after R0 resection in patients with hormone receptor-negative recurrence and no clinical or imaging evidence of distant metastasis are still being discussed. The results of the CALOR trial (Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer) presented by Aebi et al. at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December 2012 include new data which may lead to changes in current therapeutic approaches [89]. The CALOR trial was the result of a co-operation between the Breast International Group (BIG) and the American NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) study group.

In the study, a total of 162 patients who had repeat breast-conserving therapy for in-breast recurrence or surgery for chest wall recurrence were randomised into one of two groups. Randomisation was either into a control arm or into a chemotherapy arm. Patients with loco-regional recurrence additionally received endocrine therapy. If the recurrence was HER2-positive, the patient had the additional option of receiving HER2-targeted therapy. The chemotherapy regimen was at the discretion of the treating physicians and depended on the prior adjuvant chemotherapy administered. The requirement was the administration of at least 2 drugs (cytostatic drugs) over a treatment period of 3–6 months. Over 50 % of loco-regional recurrences are in-breast recurrences and over 30 % are chest wall recurrences. 13 % of patients included in the study had metastatic spread into regional lymph nodes.

The results showed a benefit for the group of patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Disease-free survival (DFS) in the chemotherapy group after 5 years was 69 % compared to 57 % for the control group (HR 0.59; 95 % CI 0.35–0.99; p = 0.046), and 5-year overall survival was 88 % for the chemotherapy group compared to 76 % for the controls (HR 0.41; 95 % CI 0.19–0.89; p = 0.02) ([Fig. 1]). Multivariate analysis showed that chemotherapy remained a significant prognostic factor for both disease-free and overall survival.

Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Overall survival in the CALOR trial [89]. The CALOR (Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer) trial demonstrated a survival benefit of 12 % for patients with loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer treated with chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was particularly effective for the group of patients with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer.

The benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy was most significant for patients with hormone receptor-negative loco-regional recurrence: after 5 years, 67 % were still disease-free compared to 35 % who had not received additional chemotherapy (HR 0.32; 95 % CI 0.14–0.73; p = 0.007). This significant benefit was not found for patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer (DFS: 70 vs. 69 %, HR 0.94, p = 0.87; overall survival). The 5-year overall survival rate for patients with hormone receptor-negative loco-regional recurrence was 79 % for patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy compared to 69 % for controls (HR 0.43; 95 % CI 0.15–1.24; p = 0.12). In the hormone receptor-positive cohort, the difference in 5-year overall survival was 94 % compared to 80 %, although this figure was not statistically significant (HR 0.40, 95 % CI 0.12–1.28; p = 0.12). The lack of statistical significance in the subgroups with regard to overall survival can be explained by the small size of the cohorts.

It is safe to assume that these new findings will not only have an impact on future therapy recommendations but also for practical clinical management.

It is recommended that patients with resectable tumours, positive HER2 status and no previous trastuzumab therapy should receive trastuzumab, although this recommendation has only been extrapolated from findings and studies of patients with metastatic disease [1], [53]. This recommendation needs to be modified for patients who previously received trastuzumab as adjuvant therapy. New targeted therapies such as pertuzumab could be of interest here. Both trastuzumab therapy and chemotherapy are clearly indicated in patients with advanced non-resectable tumours.


#

Radiotherapy of Loco-Regional Recurrence of Breast Cancer

If a patient did not have radiotherapy during primary, usually multimodal therapy, radiotherapy is indicated for loco-regional recurrence. This applies to patients undergoing repeat breast-conserving surgery and to patients who have mastectomy or surgical resection for regional lymph node recurrence and improves the chances of curative surgery. If radiotherapy was included as part of primary multimodal treatment, radiotherapy should not be used to treat recurrence in the irradiated area. In these patients, low-dose repeat radiation therapy with hyperthermia may offer an effective option [85], [90], [91], [92], [93], [94], [95].

For recurrence after mastectomy

If primary therapy already included post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) of the chest wall, repeat small volume radiation therapy (usually electron radiotherapy) is indicated in patients with unfavourable risk factors after surgery for recurrence [96], [97], [98], although this must be discussed individually for every patient as the associated complication rates are high.


#

After repeat breast-conserving surgical therapy

If radiotherapy is done after primary breast-conserving surgery, treatment of in-breast recurrence can consist of repeat local breast-conserving excision followed in individual cases by repeat external radiation therapy or interstitial brachytherapy applied locally to reduce the risk of re-recurrence and prevent salvage mastectomy. This approach does not appear to compromise survival compared to ablation but further prospective studies are required for confirmation [99], [100], [101].


#

For local/regional inoperable recurrence

Repeat radiation therapy with hyperthermia is recommended for patients with inoperable in-breast recurrence. This recommendation also applies even if mastectomy with radical resection of in-breast recurrence was not possible or if other unfavourable features are present, e.g. lymphangiosis cutis [85], [90], [92], [93], [95]. The significant improvement of local tumour control achieved by synchronous radiotherapy with hyperthermia compared to radiotherapy alone has been confirmed in six randomised studies [91], [94], [98].


#
#

Electrochemotherapy (ECT), a New Local Palliative Therapy

Electrochemotherapy represents an innovative approach for the treatment of loco-regional recurrence in a palliative setting [102], [103], [104], [105]. Palliative treatment consists of the administration of a low-dose cytostatic drug, usually bleomycin, administered at a dosage of 15 mg/m2 body surface area and the additional use of electroporation to increase the local effectiveness of the cytostatic drug. This causes no damage to healthy tissue, as it only temporarily increases the permeability of the cell to admit the locally applied cytostatic drug using a current pulse ([Fig. 2]). Depending on the extent of the surface treated using electroporation, clinical side effects can include transient reddening of the skin and, depending on the depth of treatment, fascicular twitching of muscle during the application followed by sore muscles post-therapy. Variously shaped electrodes and needle sizes are available for local treatment.

Zoom Image
Fig. 2 Diagram of reversible electroporation using the cliniporator.

#

Conclusion

Compared to patients with distant metastasis, a curative approach is possible for patients with clinically proven isolated loco-regional recurrence. This requires an individualised and interdisciplinary strategy and includes surgical therapy with or without radiotherapy and/or systemic therapy. Treatment strategies must always be based on a treatment plan agreed upon in an interdisciplinary tumour conference.

The current therapy recommendations propose the use of endocrine systemic therapy to treat patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, currently there are no such clear recommendations on chemotherapy for patients with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer. The current data of the CALOR trial challenge this and indicate that this must be reassessed. It can be safely assumed that the new findings will not only affect future therapy recommendations, they will also have an impact on the entire clinical management of isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer.


#

Conflict of Interest

None.


#

Definition, Häufigkeit und Prognose des lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs (adaptiert von der interdisziplinären S3-Leitlinie für die Diagnostik, Therapie und Nachsorge des Mammakarzinoms, 2012 [1])

Als lokale bzw. lokoregionäre Rezidive werden bezeichnet:

  • das Wiederauftreten des Mammakarzinoms in der ipsilateralen Brust,

  • an der ipsilateralen Thoraxwand inklusive der darüber liegenden Haut,

  • der regionalen Lymphknoten der Axilla,

  • der Supra- und Infraklavikularregion,

  • und entlang der Mammaria-interna-Gefäße.

Das lokale bzw. lokoregionäre Rezidiv kann isoliert oder in Kombination mit Fernmetastasen in anderen Organsystemen vorliegen [2], [3].

Lokalrezidive nach brusterhaltender Operation und Bestrahlung treten mit einer Häufigkeit von 5–10 % (nach 10 Jahren) auf. Die mediane 5-Jahres-Überlebensrate beträgt 65 % (45–79 %) [4]. Rezidive an der Thoraxwand nach Mastektomie werden in 4 % (2–20 %) (zusätzlich in der Supraklavikulargrube in 34 % [5]) und Rezidive in der Axilla in 1 % (0,1–8 %) beobachtet [4], [6]. Diese Patientinnen weisen ein 5-Jahres-Überleben von 50 % (24–78 %) bzw. 55 % (31–77 %) auf [4]. An verschiedenen Stellen gleichzeitig auftretende lokale oder lokoregionale Rezidive werden mit einer Häufigkeit von 16 % (8–19 %) beobachtet und sind mit einem 5-Jahres-Überleben von 21 % (18–23 %) verbunden [7] ([Tab. 1]).

Tab. 1 Häufigkeit und Prognose des lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs bei Patientinnen mit einem Mammakarzinom (adaptiert von AGO [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie e. V.] Guidelines Breast Version 2 013.1D).

Lokalisation

Häufigkeit (%)

5-Jahres-Gesamtüberleben (%)

ipsilaterales In-Brust-Rezidiv (post BET + Radiatio)

10 (2–20)

65 (45–79)

Thoraxwand (post Mastektomie)

4 (2–20)

50 (24–78)

zusätzlich Supraklavikulargrube

34

49 (3-y. OS)

Axilla:

  • nach Axilladissektion

1 (0.1–8)

55 (31–77)

  • nach SNB

1

93

multiple Lokalisationen

16 (8–19)

21 (18–23)

Die Früherkennung des isolierten lokalen bzw. lokoregionären Rezidivs hat einen positiven Einfluss auf das Überleben [8]. Damit ist die regelmäßige Überprüfung der lokalen und axillären Tumorfreiheit eine wichtige Aufgabe der Nachsorge. Dementsprechend werden lokale/lokoregionäre Rezidive überwiegend mit kurativer (50–70 %) und lediglich bei ca. 30 % mit palliativer Zielsetzung therapiert [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], zu den Risikofaktoren der Entstehung eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs siehe [Tab. 2] [8], [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21], [22], [23], [24], [25], [26], [27], [28], [29], [30].

Tab. 2 Risikofaktoren für die Entstehung eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs nach MRM oder BET (adaptiert von AGO Guidelines Breast Version 2 013.1D).

junges Alter

positive mikroskopische Ränder

unterlassene Strahlentherapie (falls adjuvant indiziert)

ausgedehnte intraduktale Komponente

Gefäßinvasion

triple-negativ und HER2+/HR neg. vs. HR pos.

Grading (G3 vs. G1)

erhöhte Proliferationsmarker (z. B. Ki67)

pT (> 2 vs. ≤ 2 cm)

pN (N1 vs. N0)

Anzahl befallener Lymphknoten

medialer Tumorsitz (vs. zentral/lateral)

Der Verlauf und das biologische Verhalten des In-Brust-Rezidivs nach brusterhaltender Therapie (BET) und des Lokalrezidivs nach modifiziert radikaler Mastektomie (MRM) unterscheiden sich nicht wesentlich [25], [31], [32], [33]. Beim Auftreten eines lokalen Rezidivs gelten weiterhin die primären Prognose- bzw. Prädiktivfaktoren ([Tab. 3]), wie Tumorgröße [8], [34], Multifokalität [8], Lokalisation [27], [34], Grading [35] und HER2- bzw. Hormonrezeptorstatus [35], [36], [37], [38].

Tab. 3 Prognostische und prädiktive Faktoren für den Krankheitsverlauf nach Auftreten eines lokalen/lokoregionalen Rezidivs nach MRM oder BET (adaptiert von AGO Guidelines Breast Version 2 013.1D).

Risikofaktoren beim Lokalrezidiv für das Auftreten eines Re-Rezidivs:

  • Tumorgröße

  • Multifokalität

  • Lokalisation

Risikofaktoren beim Lokalrezidiv für Metastasen/Überleben:

  • frühes (< 2–3 J.) vs. spätes Rezidiv

  • Häm- und/oder Lymphangiosis carcinomatosa/Grading/ER-neg./knappe Resektionsränder (falls > 2 Faktoren pos.)

prädiktive Faktoren für therapeutische Erwägungen:

  • HER2-Status

  • ER/PR-Status

Unterschiede bestehen zwischen „frühen“ (< 2–3 Jahre) und „späten“ (> 2–3 Jahre) Lokalrezidiven. Die „frühen“ Rezidive können in einem geringeren Maße geheilt werden und sind auch mit einer höheren Zweitrezidiv- und Fernmetastasierungsrate korreliert [8], [39], [40].

Im Einzelfall kann die Abgrenzung eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs von einem ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinom schwierig sein [41]: Für ein Zweitkarzinom, das wie ein primäres Mammakarzinom kurativ zu behandeln ist, sprechen:

  • langes zeitliches Intervall zum Erstkarzinom

  • unterschiedliche Lokalisation in der Mamma

  • unterschiedliche Tumorbiologie (Hormonrezeptor-, HER2-Status, Grading).

Ein Lokalrezidiv bzw. ein lokoregionäres Rezidiv wird meist zunächst lokal therapiert. Bei operablen Fällen ist eine komplette Exzision des Rezidivtumors anzustreben (d. h. histologisch freie Ränder). Eine postoperative Radiotherapie nach Exstirpation kann die lokale Tumorkontrolle verbessern [42].

Bei Inoperabilität ohne Vorliegen von Fernmetastasen ist die Radiotherapie das Therapieverfahren der Wahl [42]. Aufgrund des hohen Risikos für eine nachfolgende systemische Progression kann neben der lokalen Therapie des Rezidivs (Operation und/oder Radiotherapie) eine systemische Therapie zusätzlich erwogen werden [43], [44]. Der Effekt einer systemischen Chemotherapie war hierbei allerdings bisher noch nicht durch prospektive randomisierte Studien belegt [38], [44], [45], [46], [47].


#

Operative Therapieansätze beim lokal/lokoregionären Rezidiv eines Mammakarzinoms (adaptiert von der interdisziplinären S3-Leitlinie für die Diagnostik, Therapie und Nachsorge des Mammakarzinoms, 2012 [1])

Im Vergleich zu einer Fernmetastasierung besteht bei einem klinisch nachgewiesenen alleinigen lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv ein kurativer Ansatz, welcher ein individualisiertes Vorgehen erfordert.

Die Therapie von Lokalrezidiven besteht in der operativen Entfernung. Die höchste Tumorkontrolle wird hierbei durch die Mastektomie erzielt [25]. Ein erneutes brusterhaltendes Vorgehen kann bei günstiger Ausgangsposition – DCIS oder invasives Karzinom mit langem rezidivfreiem Intervall oder bei fehlendem Hautbefall bzw. großem Abstand zur primären Tumorlokalisation – erfolgen [48], [49].

Die Inzidenz von lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiven nach Mastektomie beträgt 2–20 % [4]. Unter diesen ist bei etwa einem Drittel der Rückfall lokoregionär begrenzt und – in absteigender Häufigkeit – an der Thoraxwand, in der Supraklavikularregion, in der Axilla sowie in 10–30 % multilokal manifestiert [50], [51], [52].


#

Bedeutung der histologischen Sicherung und Entnahme von Tumorgewebe zur erneuten Bestimmung der Prognoseparameter beim lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs des Mammakarzinoms

Bei klinischem Verdacht eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs muss zunächst eine histopathologische Abklärung erfolgen, u. a. auch zur Bestimmung prognoserelevanter biologischer Eigenschaften des Tumors, wie z. B. des Proliferationsmarkers Ki-67, des Hormonrezeptorstatus oder des HER2-Status [21], [53], [54], [55].

Bei lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiven des Mammakarzinoms können sich die Faktoren im Vergleich zum Primärtumor wandeln [56]. In einer Übersicht [56] von 8 Studien [57], [58], [59], [60], [61], [62], [63], [64] die den Hormonrezeptor- und HER2-Status beim lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv untersucht haben, zeigten sich deutliche Unterschiede zwischen dem Primärtumor und dem Rezidiv (5,5–38,1 % für den Östrogenrezeptor [ER], 11,8–34,9 % für den Progesteronrezeptor [PR], und 1,1–16,7 % für den HER2-Status) mit einem durchschnittlichen Wert von 19,8 % (median = 13,4 %; n = 271) für ER, 27,1 % (median = 28,6 %; n = 242) für PR, und 6,6 % (median = 1,6 %; n = 177) für HER2 ([Tab. 4]).

Tab. 4 Unterschiede in der ER-, PR- und HER2-Expression zwischen Primärtumor und lokalem/lokoregionärem Rezidiv (modifiziert nach [56]).

Methode

Unterschied ER-Expression

Unterschied PR-Expression

Unterschied HER-2 Expression

Literatur

IHC = Immunohistochemistry, FISH/CISH = Fluorescent/Chromogene in situ hybridization, DCA = Dextran-charcoal assay

IHC/CISH

4/50 (8,0 %)

16/50 (32,0 %)

0/48 (0 %)

[57]

IHC/FISH

5/30 (16,7 %)

[59]

IHC/EIA

4/14 (28,6 %)

4/14 (28,6 %)

0/14 (0 %)

[64]

ICH

6/45 (13,0 %)

16/45 (42,0 %)

1/45 (2,0 %)

[61]

IHC

24/63 (38,1 %)

22/63 (34,9 %)

[62]

ICH

9/279 (3,2 %)

[58]

DCA

7/48 (15,0 %)

[60]

DCA

4/29 (13,8 %)

[63]

Derartige Unterschiede könnten möglicherweise durch die postoperativen, adjuvanten Therapieformen wie Radiotherapie, Chemotherapie oder endokrine Therapie verursacht worden sein. In der Studie mit den geringsten Unterschieden des Hormonrezeptorstatus war ein Cut-off-Limit von 1 % für die ER/PR-Expression gewählt worden [57]. Dieses entspricht den aktuellen Empfehlungen [54], welches in der Folge dazu führt, dass es per Definition zukünftig mehr hormonrezeptorpositive Mammakarzinome geben wird. Dieses könnte auch zu geringeren Unterschieden bezüglich der Beurteilung des Hormonrezeptorstatus zwischem dem Primärtumor und einem Rezidiv führen, da ein Rezidiv trotz einer deutlichen Reduktion der Hormonrezeptorexpression (eine Reduktion ist der häufigere Fall) sehr wohl noch als hormonrezeptorpositiv gewertet wird. Mit Ausnahme der Untersuchung von Guarneri et al. [59] (16,7 %) waren die Unterschiede bezüglich des HER2-Status zwischen Primärtumor und Rezidiv minimal (1,1–2,0 %).


#

Bedeutung der Unterscheidung eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs von einem Zweitkarzinom

Im Einzelfall kann die Abgrenzung eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs von einem ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinom schwierig sein [41]. Während angenommen wird, dass ein Lokalrezidiv von verbliebenen Tumorzellen ausgeht, scheinen ipsilaterale Zweitkarzinome De-novo-Mammakarzinome in der gleichen Brust zu sein. Dies würde bedeuten dass sich dieses Zweitkarzinom auch in seiner Tumorbiologie von dem Primärtumor unterscheidet [65].

In vielen klinischen Studien, die sich mit der brusterhaltenden Operation beim Mammakarzinom beschäftigten, zeigten sich die Lokalrezidive in ca. 80 % im Bereich des ehemaligen Primärtumors [66], [67], [68]. In Studien, in denen versucht wurde, zwischen einem Lokalrezidiv und einem ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinom zu unterscheiden, zeigten sich widersprüchliche Ergebnisse mit aber insgesamt weniger „echten“ Lokalrezidiven (50–70 %) und mehr ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinomen [20], [40], [41], [49], [69], [70], [71], [72]. Eine mögliche Erklärung für die heterogene Datenlage sind die unterschiedlich angewandten Kriterien zur Definition eines Lokalrezidivs bzw. eines ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinoms [20], [40], [41], [49], [69], [70], [71], [72]. In den meisten Studien wurden die folgenden Kriterien zur Unterscheidung eines Lokalrezidivs vom ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinom verwandt: histologischer Typ, Grading, Hormonrezeptorstatus und Lokalisation. Allerdings wurden in manchen Studien auch Parameter wie Resektionsränder und zellbiologische Faktoren aus Durchflusszytometrie-Analysen (FACS) einbezogen (zusammengefasst in [41]).

In den meisten Studien war das Zeitintervall bis zur Entstehung eines Lokalrezidivs kürzer als bis zur Entstehung eines ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinoms und die Prognose für Patientinnen mit einem lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv war insgesamt schlechter als bei Patientinnen mit einem ipsilateralem Zweitkarzinom (zusammengefasst in [41]). Eingeräumt werden muss hier allerdings, dass die oben genannten unterschiedlichen Kriterien für eine heterogene Datenlage gesorgt haben könnten und hier weitere pathologische und molekularbiologische Untersuchungen Klarheit schaffen müssen [73].

Von einem ipsilateralen lokalen bzw. lokoregionären Rezidiv bzw. ipsilateralen Zweitkarzinom sind die kontralateralen Zweitkarzinome sowie zervikale Lymphknotenmetastasen und Lymphknotenmetastasen der kontralateralen A. mammaria interna abzugrenzen.

2–20 % der Patientinnen mit einem Mammakarzinom entwickeln ein kontralaterales Zweitkarzinom (synchrones Zweitkarzinom – kurzes Zeitintervall; metachrones Zweitkarzinom – längeres Zeitintervall) [74], [75], allerdings gibt es sowohl in der Literatur als auch in den Therapieempfehlungen keine einheitlichen Definitionen. Nach Erstdiagnose eines Mammakarzinoms beträgt das Zweitkarzinomrisiko pro Jahr 0,7–1,8 %, und bei BRCA-1/2-Mutationsträgerinnen liegt das Risiko bei 18–40 % [76], [77].

Eine offene Frage ist, ob eine Patientin mit einem lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv oder eine Patientin mit einem kontralateralem Zweitkarzinom eine bessere Prognose aufweist. Aktuelle Studien konnten für das kontralaterale Zweitkarzinom im Vergleich zum ipsilateralen Lokalrezidiv sowohl eine bessere als auch schlechtere Prognose [74], [78], [79] zeigen.

Mit einem kontralateralen Zweitkarzinom assoziierte Prognosefaktoren sind Alter, Zeitintervall zwischen beiden Karzinomen, Art und Weise der Detektion des Zweitkarzinoms, adjuvante Therapie des ersten Karzinoms, Hormonrezeptorstatus (bei hormonrezeptornegativem Primärtumor 10-fach erhöhtes Risiko für die Entwicklung eines sekundär hormonrezeptornegativen Tumors) und BRCA-1/2-Mutation [74], [75], [76], [80], [81].

Unklar ist auch, ob das kontralaterale Zweitkarzinom wie ein neuer Primärtumor behandelt (2 individuelle Karzinome) werden soll und inwieweit eine biologische Beziehung zwischen 1. und 2. Karzinom besteht [20], [74].

Da die biologischen Eigenschaften des Rezidivs bzw. des Zweitkarzinoms, aber auch die des Primärtumors großen Einfluss sowohl auf die Prognose als auch auf die Therapiewahl haben, beschäftigen sich aktuelle Studien mit verschiedenen Ansätzen zur genaueren patho-biologischen Differenzierung bzw. der Pathogenese von Zweitkarzinomen [75], [82]. Neben den bekannten immunhistochemischen Parametern stellt der HUMARA Clonality Assay einen modernen Ansatz dar, um zu prüfen ob 2 Tumoren aus den gleichen Vorläuferzellen (progenitor cells) entstanden sind. Dies ist eine Klonalitätsanalyse mittels PCR-Amplifikation X-chromosomal gebundener Gene, eine Methode zur Analyse der Klonalität von Tumoren, die in der Untersuchung des Inaktivierungsmusters von X-Chromosomen-gekoppelten Genloci bei Tumoren weiblicher Patienten besteht [75].


#

Bedeutung und Indikation zur systemischen Therapie des lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs beim Mammakarzinom

Die endokrine systemische Therapie stellt sowohl in der Prä- als auch in der Postmenopause eine auf hohem Evidenzniveau abgesicherte Indikation bei Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptorpositiven Rezidivtumor dar [1], [43], [83], [84].

Für die Indikationsstellung zur Chemotherapie existierten bislang keine ausreichend validen Daten aus klinischen kontrollierten Studien, sodass weder in der aktuellen Fassung der ESMO (European Society for Medical Oncology)-Guideline [53], der NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network)-Guideline [85] noch der deutschen S3-Leitlinie [1] diesbezüglich eine eindeutige Empfehlung ausgesprochen worden ist. Das Gleiche galt für Patientinnen mit einem Thoraxwandrezidiv nach Mastektomie oder auch im Falle eines ipsilateralen axillären Rezidivs [38], [45], [86], [87]. Eine Systemtherapie war lediglich zur Verkleinerung einer prinzipiell operablen Rezidivmanifestation indiziert, wenn primär ein R0-Status nicht sicher erreicht werden konnte bzw. wenn die Operabilität nicht gegeben war [38], [45], [86], [87], [88] ([Tab. 5]).

Tab. 5 Indikation zur Systemtherapie bei Patientinnen mit einem lokalen/lokoregionären Rezdiv des Mammakarzinoms.

Downstaging zur Erreichung/Optimierung der Operabilität

nach R0-Resektion im kurativen Sinne

zur primären Therapie bei wiederholtem Rezidiv und nicht mehr gegebener Möglichkeit einer Operation bzw. Radiotherapie

bei simultan bestehender viszeraler und/oder ossärer Metastasierung

möglichst histologische Sicherung und Bestimmung des Hormonrezeptor- und HER2-Status

  • falls ER/PR-positiv: endokrine Therapie

  • falls HER2-positiv: Hinzunahme von Trastuzumab zur Chemotherapie

Zur Diskussion führt die Frage zum Einsatz einer antineoplastischen systemischen Therapie nach erreichter R0-Resektion bei klinischem bzw. in der Bildgebung fehlendem Fernmetastasennachweis insbesondere bei Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptornegativen Rezidiv. Einen neuen Aspekt mit möglicherweise resultierender Änderung des bisherigen therapeutischen Vorgehens präsentierte die CALOR-Studie (Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer), die von Aebi et al. beim San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium im Dezember 2012 vorgestellt wurde [89]. Die CALOR-Studie war eine Kooperation zwischen der Breast International Group (BIG) mit der US-amerikanischen NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project)-Studiengruppe.

Im Rahmen der Studie wurden insgesamt 162 Patientinnen nach erneuter brusterhaltender Therapie sowohl aufgrund eines In-Brust-Rezidivs als auch nach operativer Therapie eines Thoraxwandrezidivs randomisiert. Die Randomisation erfolgte entweder in einen Beobachtungsarm oder in einen Arm mit nachfolgender Chemotherapie. Dabei erhielten Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptorpositiven lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv zusätzlich eine endokrine Therapie. Im Falle eines positiven HER2-Status des Rezidivtumors war eine HER2-gerichtete Therapie optional. Das Chemotherapieregime konnte in Abhängigkeit von der Vorbehandlung durch die jeweiligen therapierenden Ärztinnen und Ärzte ausgewählt werden. Voraussetzung war, dass jeweils mindestens 2 Therapeutika (Zytostatika) über einen Behandlungszeitraum von 3–6 Monaten eingesetzt wurden. In über 50 % der lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidive handelte es sich dabei um ein In-Brust-Rezidiv, in knapp über 30 % um ein Thoraxwandrezidiv. Einen metastatischen Befall der regionären Lymphknoten zeigten 13 % der Patientinnen, die in die Studie eingeschlossen wurden.

Die Ergebnisse präsentieren für das Gesamtkollektiv Vorteile zugunsten der chemotherapeutisch behandelten Patientinnen: Nach 5 Jahren waren noch 69 vs. 57 % krankheitsfrei (HR 0,59; 95 %-KI 0,35–0,99; p = 0,046). Das 5-Jahres-Gesamtüberleben betrug 88 vs. 76 % (HR 0,41; 95 %-KI 0,19–0,89; p = 0,02) ([Abb. 1]). In der multivariaten Analyse zum krankheitsfreien und Gesamtüberleben blieb die Chemotherapie jeweils signifikanter prognostischer Faktor.

Zoom Image
Abb. 1 Gesamtüberleben in der CALOR-Studie [89]. In der CALOR-Studie (Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer) zeigte sich ein Überlebensvorteil von 12 % für die mit Chemotherapie behandelten Patientinnen mit einem lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv eines Mammakarzinoms. Besonders deutlich war der Vorteil zugunsten der Chemotherapie in der Gruppe der Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptornegativem Mammakarzinom zu beobachten.

Besonders deutlich profitierten Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptornegativen lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv von der Chemotherapie: Nach 5 Jahren waren noch 67 % krankheitsfrei im Vergleich zu 35 % ohne zusätzliche Chemotherapie (HR 0,32; 95 %-KI 0,14–0,73; p = 0,007). In der Gruppe der Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptorpositiven Mammakarzinom bestand dieser klare Vorteil allerdings nicht (krankheitsfreies Überleben 70 vs. 69 %, HR 0,94, p = 0,87; Gesamtüberleben). Das 5-Jahres-Gesamtüberleben der Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptornegativen lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv betrug 79 vs. 69 % zugunsten der Patientinnen mit Chemotherapie (HR 0,43; 95 %-KI 0,15–1,24; p = 0,12). Im hormorezeptorpositiven Kollektiv zeigte sich ein Unterschied im 5-Jahres-Gesamtüberleben von 94 zu 80 % – dieses jedoch nicht statistisch signifikant (HR 0,40, 95 %-KI 0,12–1,28; p = 0,12). Die fehlenden Signifikanzen in den Subgruppen in Bezug auf das Gesamtüberleben lassen sich jedoch auch durch die kleinen Kollektivgrößen erklären.

Es ist davon auszugehen, dass diese neuen Erkenntnisse nicht nur die weiteren Therapieempfehlungen beeinflussen werden, sondern auch das praktische klinische Management.

Bei Vorliegen eines positiven HER2-Status wird in jedem Falle bei Trastuzumab-naiven Patientinnen der Einsatz von Trastuzumab bei resezierbarem Tumor empfohlen, wobei diese Empfehlungen lediglich aus den Erfahrungen und Studien in der metastasierten Situation extrapoliert wurden [1], [53]. Wurde Trastuzumab bereits adjuvant verabreicht, relativiert sich auch diese Empfehlung. Ggf. werden hier zukünftig neue zielgerichtete Therapien, wie Pertuzumab, von Interesse sein. Eine klare Indikation, sowohl für eine Therapie mit Trastuzumab als auch eine Chemotherapie, bestehen für Patientinnen mit fortgeschrittenen, nicht resezierbaren Tumoren.


#

Radiotherapie des lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs des Mammakarzinoms

Sofern im Rahmen der primären, zumeist multimodalen Therapie der Patientin keine Radiotherapie erfolgte, besteht im Falle eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs die Indikation zur Radiotherapie. Dieses gilt sowohl für ein erneutes brusterhaltendes operatives Vorgehen als auch nach Mastektomie oder ein operativ entferntes regionales Lymphknotenrezidiv und erhöht die Chance auf Kuration. Erfolgte im Rahmen der multimodalen Primärtherapie eine Bestrahlungsbehandlung, ist bei einem Rezidiv in den bestrahlten Bereichen in der Regel keine Strahlentherapie mehr möglich. In solchen Fällen stellt eine niedrig dosierte neuerliche Bestrahlung mit Hyperthermie eine aussichtsreiche Option dar [85], [90], [91], [92], [93], [94], [95].

Rezidiv nach Mastektomie

War bereits während der Primärtherapie eine Post-Mastektomie-Bestrahlung (PMRT) der Thoraxwand vorgenommen worden, ist bei Vorliegen ungünstiger Risikofaktoren nach Rezidivoperation eine erneute kleinvolumige Bestrahlung – zumeist unter Verwendung von Elektronen – indiziert [96], [97], [98], wobei dies bei gegebener hoher Komplikationsrate mit jeder Patientin individuell besprochen werden muss.


#

Nach erneuter brusterhaltender operativer Therapie

Nach erfolgter Strahlentherapie bei initialem brusterhaltenden Vorgehen können bei „In-Brust“-Rezidiven und nach erneuter lokaler Exzision unter Brusterhalt in Einzelfällen eine wiederholte externe Bestrahlung oder eine interstitielle lokale Brachytherapie zur Reduktion des Re-Rezidivrisikos und zur Vermeidung einer Salvage-Mastektomie erwogen werden. Ein solches Vorgehen scheint die Überlebenswahrscheinlichkeit gegenüber einem ablativen Vorgehen nicht zu kompromittieren, muss aber noch durch prospektive Studien abgesichert werden [99], [100], [101].


#

Bei lokaler/regionaler Inoperabilität

Im Falle eines inoperablen In-Brust-Rezidivs wird eine neuerliche Bestrahlung mit Hyperthermie empfohlen. Dieselbe Empfehlung gilt auch, wenn mit einer Mastektomie aufgrund eines Brustrezidivs der Tumor nicht radikal entfernt wurde oder wenn andere ungünstige Konstellationen, z. B. eine Lymphangiosis cutis, vorliegen [85], [90], [92], [93], [95]. Die signifikante Verbesserung der lokalen Tumorkontrolle durch eine synchrone Hyperthermie im Vergleich mit einer alleinigen Radiotherapie wurde in 6 randomisierten Studien nachgewiesen [91], [94], [98].


#
#

Neue Lokaltherapieverfahren in der Palliation, Elektrochemotherapie (ECT)

Mit der Elektrochemotherapie steht ein innovatives Verfahren zur Behandlung eines lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidivs in der palliativen Situation zur Verfügung [102], [103], [104], [105]. Die palliative Behandlung besteht aus der Verabreichung eines niedrig dosierten Zytostatikums, aktuell in der Regel Bleomycin, mit einer Dosierung von 15 mg/m2 Körperoberfläche und die zusätzliche Anwendung der Elektroporation in der Zielsetzung, die Wirksamkeit des Zytostatikums lokal zu erhöhen. Dabei wird gesundes Gewebe nicht geschädigt, sondern ausschließlich während eines Stromimpulses die Zellpermeabilität der Tumorzellen für das lokal verabreichte Zytostatikums erhöht ([Abb. 2]). Klinische Nebenwirkungen sind je nach Ausmaß der mittels Elektroporation behandelten Fläche eine vorübergehende Rötung der Haut und je nach Tiefe während der Behandlung auftretende Muskelfaszikulationen und posttherapeutisch Beschwerden analog eines Muskelkaters. Zur Verfügung stehen Elektroden in verschiedenen Formen und Nadelgrößen zur lokalen Behandlung.

Zoom Image
Abb. 2 Schematische Darstellung der reversiblen Elektroporation mit dem Cliniporator

#

Fazit

Im Vergleich zu einer Fernmetastasierung besteht bei Patientinnen mit einem klinisch nachzuweisenden alleinigen lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv ein kurativer Ansatz, der ein individualisiertes und interdisziplinäres Vorgehen erfordert, bestehend aus operativer Therapie mit oder ohne Strahlentherapie und/oder einer systemischen Therapie. Grundlage sollte immer eine Therapieplanung im Rahmen einer interdisziplinären Tumorkonferenz sein.

Neben den aktuellen Therapieempfehlungen, die für die Patientin mit einem hormonrezeptorpositiven Mammakarzinom eine endokrine systemische Therapie vorsehen, bestand für die Patientin mit einem hormonrezeptornegativem Mammakarzinom keine eindeutige Empfehlung zugunsten einer Chemotherapie. Aktuelle Daten der CALOR-Studie stellen dieses infrage bzw. regen dazu an, dieses kritisch zu überdenken. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass diese neuen Erkenntnisse nicht nur die weiteren Therapieempfehlungen beeinflussen werden, sondern auch das gesamte klinische Management des alleinigen lokalen bzw. lokoregionären Rezidivs.


#

Interessenkonflikt

Nein.


#
#

Correspondence

Dr. Christian R. Loehberg, M. D.
University Hospital of Erlangen, Dept. of OB/Gyn
Universitätsstraße 21–23
91054 Erlangen


Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Overall survival in the CALOR trial [89]. The CALOR (Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer) trial demonstrated a survival benefit of 12 % for patients with loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer treated with chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was particularly effective for the group of patients with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer.
Zoom Image
Fig. 2 Diagram of reversible electroporation using the cliniporator.
Zoom Image
Abb. 1 Gesamtüberleben in der CALOR-Studie [89]. In der CALOR-Studie (Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer) zeigte sich ein Überlebensvorteil von 12 % für die mit Chemotherapie behandelten Patientinnen mit einem lokalen/lokoregionären Rezidiv eines Mammakarzinoms. Besonders deutlich war der Vorteil zugunsten der Chemotherapie in der Gruppe der Patientinnen mit einem hormonrezeptornegativem Mammakarzinom zu beobachten.
Zoom Image
Abb. 2 Schematische Darstellung der reversiblen Elektroporation mit dem Cliniporator