Endoscopy 2010; 42: E204-E205
DOI: 10.1055/s-0030-1255704
Unusual cases and technical notes

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Acute obstructive cholangitis caused by an enterolith in a duodenal diverticulum

T.  Nonaka1 , M.  Inamori2 , T.  Kessoku1 , Y.  Ogawa1 , K.  Imajyo1 , S.  Yanagisawa1 , T.  Shiba1 , T.  Sakaguchi1 , A.  Nakajima2 , S.  Maeda2 , K.  Atsukawa1 , H.  Takahashi1
  • 1Department of Gastroenterology, Hiratsuka City Hospital, Hiratsuka, Japan
  • 2Gastroenterology Division, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan
Further Information

M. Inamori, MD, PhD 

Gastroenterology Division
Yokohama City University School of Medicine

3-9 Fukuura
Kanazawa-ku
Yokohama
236-0004 Japan

Fax: +81-45-784-3546

Email: inamorim@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp

Publication History

Publication Date:
15 September 2010 (online)

Table of Contents

Duodenal diverticula are common. While they are usually asymptomatic, several complications have been reported.

A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with high-grade fever (39.6 ° C) and jaundice. His laboratory data showed liver dysfunction and elevations of the white blood cell count and serum C-reactive protein concentration. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated dilated biliary ducts. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a diverticulum in the second part of the duodenum ([Fig. 1]).

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Fig. 1 Computed tomographic image showing a diverticulum in the second part of the duodenum.

We suspected obstructive cholangitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a periampullary diverticulum occupied by a yellow stone ([Fig. 2]).

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Fig. 2 Endoscopic examination revealed a periampullary diverticulum occupied by a yellow stone. The arrow indicates the ampulla of Vater.

ERC showed no abnormalities ([Fig. 3]).

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Fig. 3 Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed no abnormalities.

Therefore, we made a diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction caused by an enterolith in the periampullary duodenal diverticulum. We performed successful endoscopic removal of the enterolith ([Fig. 4]).

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Fig. 4 Successful endoscopic removal of the enterolith was performed.

The extracted enterolith was oval-shaped, yellowish in color, measured approximately 3 cm in diameter, and had a hard outer rim with an irregular surface ([Fig. 5]).

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Fig. 5 Enterolith removed from the duodenal diverticulum.

Separate layers within the wall were appreciated and there was no evidence of any nidus, such as a fruit pit.

Infrared absorption spectrophotometry showed that the enterolith consisted mainly of deoxycholic acid ([Fig. 6]).

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Fig. 6 Infrared absorption spectrophotometry showed that the enterolith consisted mainly of deoxycholic acid. T, transmittance.

Duodenal diverticula are commonly encountered and are generally regarded as clinically insignificant entities. They can, however, sometimes produce serious complications, including diverticulitis, perforation, hemorrhage, biliary and/or pancreatic obstruction, partial duodenal obstruction, fistula formation with adjacent organs, diarrhea secondary to blind loop syndrome, and enterolith formation [1].

Enterolith formation is known to occur within regions of stasis, such as Meckel’s diverticulum or a blind loop, or as a result of stricture due to Crohn’s disease or tuberculosis. Duodenal diverticula may also represent such a region of stasis [2].

In conclusion, we performed successful endoscopic removal of an enterolith in a duodenal diverticulum. Obstructive cholangitis caused by an enterolith in a periampullary diverticulum is rare, but is an important entity for endoscopists.

Competing interests: None

Endoscopy_UCTN_Code_CCL_1AZ_2AI

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References

M. Inamori, MD, PhD 

Gastroenterology Division
Yokohama City University School of Medicine

3-9 Fukuura
Kanazawa-ku
Yokohama
236-0004 Japan

Fax: +81-45-784-3546

Email: inamorim@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp

#

References

M. Inamori, MD, PhD 

Gastroenterology Division
Yokohama City University School of Medicine

3-9 Fukuura
Kanazawa-ku
Yokohama
236-0004 Japan

Fax: +81-45-784-3546

Email: inamorim@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp

Zoom Image

Fig. 1 Computed tomographic image showing a diverticulum in the second part of the duodenum.

Zoom Image

Fig. 2 Endoscopic examination revealed a periampullary diverticulum occupied by a yellow stone. The arrow indicates the ampulla of Vater.

Zoom Image

Fig. 3 Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed no abnormalities.

Zoom Image

Fig. 4 Successful endoscopic removal of the enterolith was performed.

Zoom Image

Fig. 5 Enterolith removed from the duodenal diverticulum.

Zoom Image

Fig. 6 Infrared absorption spectrophotometry showed that the enterolith consisted mainly of deoxycholic acid. T, transmittance.