CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2020; 80(02): 172-178
DOI: 10.1055/a-1079-5283
GebFra Science
Original Article/Originalarbeit
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

An Economic Analysis of Aneuploidy Screening of Oocytes in Assisted Reproduction in Germany

Eine Kostenanalyse zur Aneuploidieuntersuchung von Eizellen im Kontext der assistierten Reproduktion in Deutschland
Kay Neumann
1  Sektion für gynäkologische Endokrinologie und Reproduktionsmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
2  Universitäres Kinderwunschzentrum Lübeck und Manhagen & PID Zentrum Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
,
Georg Griesinger
1  Sektion für gynäkologische Endokrinologie und Reproduktionsmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
2  Universitäres Kinderwunschzentrum Lübeck und Manhagen & PID Zentrum Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Correspondence/Korrespondenzadresse

Prof. Dr. med. M.Sc. Georg Griesinger
Sektion für gynäkologische Endokrinologie und Reproduktionsmedizin
Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein
Campus Lübeck
Ratzeburger Allee 160
23538 Lübeck
Germany   

Publication History

received 04 September 2019
revised 19 November 2019

accepted 07 December 2019

Publication Date:
21 February 2020 (online)

 

Abstract

Background The randomized ESTEEM trial reported that preimplantation genetic aneuploidy testing of oocytes by polar body biopsy (PGT-A) with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in women aged 36 – 40 years undergoing assisted reproduction treatment reduces the number of embryo transfers and the risk of miscarriage while not impacting the live birth rate.

Method A decision tree model based on data from the ESTEEM trial was created and analyzed, using three cost scenarios for assisted reproduction treatment in Germany (statutory health insurance [GKV] = the deductible is 50% of the standard medical costs; private medical insurance [PKV] = invoicing is based on the German medical fee schedule [GOÄ]; private medical insurance with a simple GOÄ factor [simple GOÄ factor] = invoicing is based on the standard medical fees multiplied by a linear GOÄ factor). The scenarios were compared for cost-effectiveness (cost per live birth), cost per prevented miscarriage and the threshold values for cost and effectiveness.

Results PGT-A increased the costs per live birth in all scenarios (GKV: + 208%; PKV: + 49%; simple GOÄ factor: + 89%). A threshold analysis showed a substantial cost discrepancy between the actual cost of the intervention based on GOÄ (€ 5801) vs. the theoretically tolerable PGT-A cost (GKV: € 561, PKV: € 1037, single GOÄ-factor: € 743). The incremental cost per one prevented miscarriage was approximately € 70 000 – 75 000 for all cost scenarios.

Conclusion The use of PGT-A with aCGH in assisted reproduction cannot be recommended from a cost-effectiveness perspective.


#

Zusammenfassung

Hintergrund Die ESTEEM-Studie zeigte, dass eine Aneuploidieuntersuchung von Eizellen durch Polkörperbiopsie (PKD) und array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) Diagnostik im Rahmen einer assistierten Reproduktion bei Frauen im Alter von 36 bis 40 Jahren die Lebendgeburtsrate nicht steigert, jedoch die Anzahl von Behandlungszyklen mit Embryoübertragung und das Abortrisiko verringert.

Methode Es wurde ein entscheidungsanalytisches Modell basierend auf Daten der ESTEEM-Studie erstellt, und drei Kostenszenarien einer assistierten Reproduktion in Deutschland aus Patientenperspektive (gesetzlich versichert [GKV] = Selbstbehalt 50% der EBM-Kosten; privat versichert [PKV] = Abrechnung basierend auf Gebührenordnung für Ärzte [GOÄ]; privat versichert [einfacher GOÄ-Faktor] Abrechnung GOÄ mit einfachem Faktor) auf Kosteneffektivität (Kosten pro Lebendgeburt), Kosten- und Effektschwellenwerte und Kosten pro verhindertem Abort untersucht.

Ergebnisse Eine PKD erhöht die Kosten pro Lebendgeburt in allen Szenarien (GKV: + 208%; PKV: + 49%; einfacher GOÄ-Faktor: + 89%). Eine Schwellenwertanalyse zeigt eine erhebliche Diskrepanz zwischen den Kosten einer aCGH-Polkörperdiagnostik von im Mittel 5801 € und den für eine Kosteneffektivität theoretisch maximal zulässigen Kosten für die genetische Diagnostik (GKV: 561 €, PKV: 1037 €, einfacher GOÄ-Faktor: 743 €). Die inkrementellen Kosten pro verhindertem Abort betragen rund 70 000 – 75 000 € in allen Kostenszenarien.

Schlussfolgerung Die Aneuploidieuntersuchung von Eizellen durch PKD und aCGH im Rahmen einer assistierten Reproduktion ist unter Kosten-Wirksamkeits-Aspekten nicht empfehlenswert.


#

Introduction

In 2017, around 63 000 women in Germany underwent assisted reproductive treatment (ART) for infertility [1]. The mean age of these women at the time of assisted reproductive treatment was 35.7 years, implying that a relevant percentage of these women were between the age of 35 – 40 years, which is considered to be an advanced maternal age (AMA). Studies have reported a higher incidence of numerical chromosomal aberrations for this age group in embryos created by assisted reproductive techniques, and this is considered to be the main cause of the increasing risk of miscarriage and the decreasing likelihood of a live birth in this age group [2], [3]. Chromosomal aberrations can develop at different stages of parental meiosis, fertilization and early embryonic development, respectively, with female meiosis considered to be the most common cause of numerical chromosomal anomalies [4], [5], [6], [7], [8]. It was therefore postulated that aneuploidy screening in the context of preimplantation diagnostic genetic testing during ART could increase the live birth rate (LBR) through negative selection of genetically abnormal, non-viable oocytes, and thereby reduce the time to pregnancy [9], [10]. One method used for aneuploidy screening is based on the biopsy of polar bodies (PBB) which are extruded by the oocyte during fertilization. Screening of polar bodies is not subject to the restrictions of the German Embryo Protection Law, meaning that no special requirements or permits are necessary to carry out PBB in contrast to the genetic screening of human embryos.

A recently published multicenter study (ESTEEM trial), the largest randomized clinical study of aneuploidy screening using PBB, was unable to find an increase in LBR for women of AMA (36 – 40 years). However, fewer embryo transfers were required following aneuploidy screening, and fewer miscarriages occurred to achieve the same LBR as the control group. Of note, 24% of patients in the PBB group had no fresh embryo transfer after ART while in the control group this figure was only 7% [11].

From the patientʼs point of view, reducing the number of embryo transfer cycles necessary to achieve live birth does not only have implications in terms of the physical stress but also in terms of financial costs. This means that calculating the cost implications for specific treatment scenarios using the available data from the ESTEEM trial is useful and appropriate.

Since 2004, patients with statutory health insurance are required to bear 50% of the costs of assisted reproductive treatments themselves. Treatment of “self-payers”, for example unmarried couples, will not be funded by an insurance company, and these patients will be charged according to the German medical fee schedule (GOÄ). Couples with private insurance are likewise charged by GOÄ, with the base rate multiplied by an additional factor. Couples undergoing ART often request adjunctive treatments such as aneuploidy screening using PBB, in the hope of increasing the efficacy of the assisted reproductive treatment. Of note, neither couples with statutory health insurance nor self-payers or couples with private health insurance are reimbursed for the costs of such additional measures, and these additional costs must be added either pro rata or in their entirety to the actual cost of treatment born by the couple. This economic analysis therefore examines the cost implications of PGT-A (aneuploidy screening based on PBB) with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) from the patient perspective, using cost-effectiveness under the current social and legal conditions in Germany as a primary endpoint.


#

Material and Methods

A decision tree model from the patientsʼ perspective based on data from the ESTEEM trial was developed using the TreeAge Pro Suite 2018 software (TreeAge Software, Inc., Williamstown, MA, USA) ([Fig. 1]) [12]. As no actual patients were involved in this theoretical study, no ethics commission was consulted prior to carrying out this analysis.

In this model, patients undergo assisted reproduction treatment with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) analogously to the ESTEEM trial. ICSI is then either followed by PTG-A with aneuploidy screening of both polar bodies using aCGH and the subsequent transfer of maximally two embryos (PGT-A group), or embryo transfer is carried out directly after ICSI with no genetic screening (control group). Surplus fertilized oocytes are cryopreserved (= frozen) and then transferred after thawing in a later cycle if the first embryo transfer does not result in pregnancy. In the ESTEEM trial, frozen embryo transfer cycles were evaluated over a period of one year from the start of assisted reproductive treatment.

Effectivity

The probability of a live birth was calculated as a live birth from the first embryo transfer and possible further transfers after a frozen embryo transfer cycle. The probability of a first and second frozen embryo transfer cycle for embryo transfer purposes was calculated based on the percentage of patients with a frozen embryo transfer cycle in both treatment arms. Patients with > 3 embryo transfers or an embryo transfer outside the period of observation of one year after randomization were not included in this analysis as these data are not available from the ESTEEM trial. The probability of a successful PGT-A was calculated for the total number of PGT-A procedures carried out. All probabilities used in the study are shown in [Fig. 1].

Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Decision tree model based on the ESTEEM trial. Nodes within the model are marked by green circles, percentages show the patient flow analogously to the ESTEEM trial. Red triangles define endpoints.

#

Cost scenarios

To depict the different billing scenarios for fertility treatment in the German healthcare system, the direct costs of assisted reproductive treatment with ICSI were simulated using three different cost scenarios from the patientsʼ perspective:

  1. Statutory health insurance (GKV): The costs of treatment are born by a statutory health insurance company based on the “uniform assessment scale” for medical fees in Germany (Einheitlicher Bewertungsmaßstab, EBM), but patients are required to pay a 50% deductible. Treatment includes hormone treatment, monitoring, follicular puncture, ICSI and embryo transfer. This corresponds to invoicing under treatment plan 10.5 according to the guideline of the Joint Federal Committee of Physicians and Health Insurance Funds in Germany (50% deductible = € 1601) [13], [14]. The patient must bear the cost of this deductible herself. The individual cost items are discussed in detail in a previous study [15].

  2. Private health insurance (PKV): Invoicing is based on the German medical fee schedule for physicians (Gebührenordnung für Ärzte, GOÄ), often with increases to the simple GOÄ rates (= € 7681) [16]. Depending on their private health insurance contract, patients with private health insurance may be reimbursed for these costs.

  3. Simple GOÄ factor: Invoicing is based on the GOÄ multiplied by a simple linear factor (= € 4328.94). Depending on their private health insurance contract, patients with private health insurance will be reimbursed for these costs.

The costs incurred for cryopreservation and a subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycle are not born by the GKV and typically also not by a private insurance, and were therefore integrated into all of the scenarios, using the German medical fee schedule for physicians (GOÄ) (cryopreservation = € 396, frozen embryo transfer cycle = € 577). The costs of a miscarriage were disregarded in all three cost scenarios, as the incidental costs of a miscarriage are born by health insurance companies irrespective of the insurance status of the affected woman.


#

Threshold value analysis

A threshold value analysis for the maximum tolerable costs for the cost-effectiveness of PGT-A was calculated for all base-case scenarios. The threshold values are therefore the costs of PGT-A above which additional costs for PGT-A are compensated by the effect. The necessary live birth rate which would be theoretically required for cost-effectiveness in the PGT-A group was simulated. This corresponds to the theoretically necessary live birth rate which would compensate for the costs of PGT-A. The cost per prevented miscarriage was calculated as follows:

Δ treatment cost per patient with vs. without PGT-A multiplied by the “number needed to treat (= 15) to reduce the incidence of miscarriage by one”.


#

Cost of PGT-A and sensitivity analysis

Carrying out PGT-A to screen for aneuploidy is self-funded by patients in all three cost scenarios, and invoicing of patients is based on the GOÄ. Calculation of the costs incurred for PGT-A include the cost of performing polar body biopsy (mean cost according to the GOÄ: € 689), the cost of a human geneticist to examine the polar body, and the material costs of aCGH (= € 900 per oocyte). The main costs are related to the material cost of the aCGH chips used and the reagents (on average, 4 chips are necessary for 10 available polar bodies). A one-way sensitivity analysis for the range € 0 – 10 000 was carried out for PGT-A aneuploidy screening with the endpoints “costs per live birth” and “mean cost per patient”.


#

Probabilistic sensitivity analysis

A probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was carried out to test for uncertainties in the assumptions of the base-case scenarios. To do this, effects were replaced by beta distributions and costs by log-normal distributions. 1000 calculations with different costs and effects were analyzed, which corresponds to the recommended requirements for economic analysis [17].

All distributions used are shown in [Table 1]. Beta distributions were assumed for probabilities, and their parameters were based on the figures observed in the ESTEEM trial. Log-normal distributions were assumed for costs, with assumed median values based on the specifications for the respective base-case scenarios. For PGT-A costs of € 5801 and a maximum cost of € 14 000 in 396 cases in the ESTEEM trial, 0.5 and 0.99937 quantiles and a log-normal distribution were assumed. This resulted in a standard deviation of the logarithm of 0.32 (variation coefficient 33%), which represents a realistic range for 95% of the values for the remaining costs ([Table 1]).

Table 1 Distributions of the probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Beta distribution was assumed for effects and log-normal distribution for costs. These figures are not the same as the probabilities and costs calculated for the basic scenarios.

Parameter

Distribution

Parameter 1

Parameter 2

Expected value

Reference

PGT-A carried out

beta

180

17

0.91

Verpoest et al. 2018 [11]

PGT-A successful

beta

1006

17

0.98

At least one embryo transfer, PGT-A

beta

149

30

0.83

At least one embryo transfer, control group

beta

171

13

0.93

Live births, PGT-A (first embryo transfer)

beta

44

105

0.29

Live births, PGT-A (additional embryo transfers)

beta

6

22

0.21

Live births, control group (first embryo transfer)

beta

38

133

0.22

Live births, control group (additional embryo transfers)

beta

7

71

0.9

First frozen embryo transfer cycle, PGT-A

beta

25

80

0.24

Second frozen embryo transfer cycle, PGT-A

beta

2

18

0.1

First frozen embryo transfer cycle, control group

beta

55

78

0.41

Second frozen embryo transfer cycle, control group

beta

15

35

0.3

Costs

Distribution

Standard deviation

At least one embryo transfer

log-normal

  • GKV

7.3

0.32

1558

  • PKV

8.9

7717

  • Simple GOÄ factor

8.4

4680

No embryo transfer

  • GKV

7.3

0.32

1558

  • PKV

8.9

7717

  • Simple GOÄ factor

8.3

4235

First frozen embryo transfer cycle

6.7

0.32

855

Additional frozen embryo transfer cycle

6.2

0.32

518

PGT-A

8.6

0.32

5717

The incremental costs to avoid a miscarriage were calculated by multiplying Δ treatment costs per patient with the “number needed to treat to benefit” in 1000 simulated scenarios.


#
#

Results

Costs per live birth and average costs per patient for the base-case scenarios

Carrying out PGT-A aneuploidy screening significantly increased the cost per live birth in all three cost scenarios. Thus, the costs per live birth increased by € 17 999 (GKV), € 16 370 (PKV) and € 17 378 (simple GOÄ factor) in the group which had PGT-A.

The average cost per patient was also significantly higher if PGT-A was carried out. The increase in the cost per patient in the PTG-A group was € 4914 (GKV), € 4895 (PKV) and € 4923 (simple GOÄ factor), respectively. [Fig. 2] shows the costs per live birth and the costs per patient for the respective cost scenarios.

Zoom Image
Fig. 2 Carrying out PTG-A results in higher costs per live birth (a) and per patient (b) in all cost combinations in the base-case scenarios.

#

Incremental cost for preventing one miscarriage

Using the assumptions of the base-case scenarios, the incremental costs of preventing a single miscarriage by additionally carrying out PGT-A were € 73 708 (GKV), € 73 434 (PKV) and € 73 980 (simple GOÄ factor), respectively.


#

Sensitivity analysis and threshold value analysis

A one-way sensitivity analysis of the cost of PGT-A ranging from € 0 to € 10 000 with the endpoints “cost per live birth” and “average cost per patient” showed a linear correlation for the costs per live birth and the costs per patient, depending on the cost of PGT-A ([Fig. 3]).

A threshold value analysis of the cost of PGT-A with the endpoint “cost per live birth” showed that for the GKV and the simple GOÄ factor scenarios, the amount at which PGT-A became cost-effective was significantly less than € 1000 (GKV: € 561, simple GOÄ factor: € 743). In contrast, in the PKV cost scenario, PGT-A becomes cost-effective when the cost of PGT-A is € 1037 or less. [Fig. 3] shows the point of intersection between the cost of PGT-A and the group which did not have PGT-A as the threshold value for cost-effectiveness (i.e., PGT-A costs above which the additionally accruing cost of PGT-A is compensated by the effect) for the respective cost scenarios.

Zoom Image
Fig. 3 Sensitivity analysis for the dependence of the cost per live birth (a) and per patient on the cost of PGT-A (b). The points of intersection define the threshold values for cost-effectiveness of PGT-A.

A simulation of the increase in the LBR required in the PGT-A group which would result in PGT-A being cost-effective and thus compensate for the additional cost of PGT-A showed a theoretically necessary increase in the LBR of > 47% per embryo transfer (the exact LBR cannot be calculated for this model as the ramifications of the decision tree model would add up to > 100%) for GKV, and an increase of + 14% for PKV and + 26% for simple GOÄ factor for the figures above which PGT-A would become cost-effective.


#

Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA)

PSA showed no cost-effectiveness in the PGT-A group across 1000 calculations for all three cost scenarios.

The median incremental costs to prevent one miscarriage based on 1000 calculations were € 63 686 (GKV: 95% confidence interval [CI]: € 60 030 – 67 587), € 64 504 (PKV: 95% CI: € 61 983 – 68 549) and € 66 117 (simple GOÄ factor: 95% CI: € 63 150 – 69 334).


#
#

Discussion

This study shows that patients of AMA with fertility problems who are entitled to have 50% of the costs of an assisted reproductive treatment cycle with ICSI reimbursed (if needed, with cryopreservation and subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycles) contribute an average of € 8600 of their own money per live birth. The LBR observed in the ESTEEM trial compares well with the documented treatment outcomes recorded in the German IVF Register for this age group. The addition of PGT-A with aCGH significantly increases these costs. This cost-effectiveness analysis from the patientsʼ point of view showed significantly higher costs per live birth for aneuploidy screening using PGT-A with aCGH for all three cost scenarios. A threshold analysis of the maximum costs of a PGT-A which would result in the same costs per live birth as in the control group showed results (€ 561, € 1037 and € 743, respectively) which were significantly below the costs incurred under GÖA for 5 oocytes (= average number of investigated oocytes in the ESTEEM trial) for aCGH. Recent technological developments have already led to a reduction in the costs of genetic diagnostics. This study explores the costs of a cost-neutral PGT-A by threshold analysis. It should be mentioned that polar body biopsy is only possible in the context of ICSI treatment. ICSI is not only more expensive than IVF treatment but should additionally be reserved for couples with severe male subfertility. The study also highlighted the enormous cost discrepancy between GKV and PKV cost scenarios which is caused by the fundamentally different payment terms for patients with GKV (= statutory health insurance) and patients with PKV (= private health insurance; invoicing is based on the GOÄ). This discrepancy is a frequently criticized issue of the German healthcare system [18].

The decision tree mode was modelled from the point of view of patients and does not take account of the costs incurred if a miscarriage occurs (relative risk PGT-A: 0.48) or the costs of a twin pregnancy (relative risk PGT-A: 0.54), which introduces bias against PGT-A. However, another cost analysis we carried out using four different international cost scenarios which took the costs of miscarriage into account also did not find that PGT-A was cost-effective [19].

A calculation of the incremental incurred cost of PGT-A to prevent a single miscarriage showed a cost dimension (at least € 73 434), which makes using PGT-A to reduce the rate of miscarriages unrealistic from an economic perspective.

In summary, in view of the high costs of genetic testing, aneuploidy screening using PGT-A with aCGH is not suitable for routine applications from the perspective of cost-effectiveness. The limitations of this cost analysis are the fact that indirect medical costs (for example, the costs of having to miss work because of miscarriage, etc.) were not incorporated in the model because such costs vary significantly and are difficult to calculate. However, because of the big discrepancy in costs between the PGT-A and the control group, it is unlikely that the results of this cost analysis would change even if indirect medical costs were also taken into account.


#

Einleitung

Aufgrund eines unerfüllten Kinderwunsches ließen in Deutschland im Jahr 2017 rund 63 000 Frauen eine assistierte Reproduktion (ART) durchführen [1]. Das durchschnittliche Alter dieser Frauen bei Behandlung betrug 35,7 Jahre, womit sich ein relevanter Anteil an Frauen im fortgeschrittenen reproduktiven Alter von 35 – 40 Jahren befindet. Für diese Altersgruppe zeigten Untersuchungen eine erhöhte Inzidenz von numerischen Chromosomenaberrationen in durch assistierte Reproduktion gezeugten Embryonen, was als Hauptursache für das in dieser Altersgruppe zunehmende Abortrisiko und die abnehmende Lebendgeburtswahrscheinlichkeit (Lebendgeburtrate, LGR) gilt [2], [3]. Chromosomale Aberrationen können während verschiedener Stadien der parentalen Meiose, Fertilisierung und frühen Embryonalentwicklung entstehen, wobei die häufigste Ursache numerischer chromosomaler Anomalien in der weiblichen Meiose begründet ist [4], [5], [6], [7], [8]. Daher wurde postuliert, dass ein Screening auf Aneuploidien durch Präimplantationsdiagnostik im Rahmen einer ART die LGR durch negative Selektion von genetisch aberranten, also nicht entwicklungsfähigen, Eizellen erhöhen und die Zeit bis zu einem Schwangerschaftseintritt verkürzen könne [9], [10]. Eine Methode eines Aneuploidiescreenings beruht auf der genetischen Untersuchung der Polkörper (PKD), die während der Fertilisierung von der Oozyte abgesondert werden. Eine Untersuchung der Polkörper fällt nicht unter die Restriktionen des deutschen Embryonenschutzgesetzes, weshalb für eine Durchführung, im Gegensatz zur genetischen Diagnostik am menschlichen Embryo, keine besonderen Genehmigungen/Voraussetzungen notwendig sind.

Eine jüngst publizierte, multizentrische Studie (ESTEEM-Studie), die größte randomisierte klinische Studie zum Aneuploidiescreening mittels PKD, konnte allerdings keine Steigerung der LGR bei Frauen im fortgeschrittenen reproduktiven Alter von 36 – 40 Jahren nachweisen. Durch die Durchführung eines Aneuploidiescreenings wurden jedoch weniger Embryoübertragungszyklen benötigt, und es traten weniger Frühaborte auf, um dieselbe LGR wie in der Kontrollgruppe zu erzielen. Allerdings hatten in der PKD-Gruppe 24% der Patienten keinen Embryotransfer nach Durchführung eines Zyklus einer assistierten Reproduktion, während es in der Kontrollgruppe nur 7% waren [11].

Eine Reduktion von Embryoübertragungszyklen hat aus Patientensicht nicht nur Belastungs-, sondern auch Kostenimplikationen, sodass auf Grundlage der aus der ESTEEM-Studie verfügbaren Daten eine Berechnung der Kostenimplikationen in spezifischen Behandlungsszenarien sinnvoll ist.

Seit 2004 müssen gesetzlich versicherte Paare 50% der Kosten einer assistierten Reproduktion selbst bezahlen. Paare ohne Anspruch gegenüber einer GKV (sog. „Selbstzahler“, bspw. unverheiratete Paare) oder Paare mit einer privaten Versicherung werden gemäß GOÄ mit unterschiedlichen Steigerungsfaktoren, je nach Aufwand, abgerechnet. In der Hoffnung, die Effizienz der assistierten Reproduktion zu steigern, werden von den Paaren mit Kinderwunsch häufig Zusatzmaßnahmen, wie beispielsweise eine PKD mit Aneuploidiescreening, in Anspruch genommen. Diese Maßnahmen werden jedoch regelhaft weder von GKV noch PKV dem Paar erstattet und addieren sich folglich zu den anteilig oder komplett durch das Paar zu finanzierenden eigentlichen Behandlungskosten. In der vorliegenden ökonomischen Analyse werden daher die Kostenimplikationen eines Aneuploidiescreenings an Polkörpern mittels array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) aus Patientensicht mit dem primären Endpunkt einer Kosteneffektivität unter den sozialrechtlichen Voraussetzungen in Deutschland untersucht.


#

Material und Methoden

Ein entscheidungsanalytisches Modell aus Patientensicht basierend auf Daten der ESTEEM-Studie wurde anhand der Software TreeAge Pro Suite 2018 (TreeAge Software, Inc., Williamstown, MA) konstruiert ([Abb. 1]) [12]. Da keine Patienten in diese theoretische Untersuchung involviert waren, wurde hierfür keine Ethik-Kommission konsultiert.

In diesem Modell führen die Patienten analog zur ESTEEM-Studie eine assistierte Reproduktion mit intrazytoplasmatischer Spermieninjektion (ICSI) durch, welche entweder zunächst von einer PKD und Aneuploidieuntersuchung beider Polkörper mittels aCGH und anschließender Übertragung von maximal 2 Embryonen (PKD-Gruppe) oder direkt von einer Embryonenübertragung ohne Selektion nach genetischem Status (Kontrollgruppe) gefolgt wird. Überzählige, fertilisierte Oozyten werden kryokonserviert (= eingefroren) und bei einem ausbleibendem Schwangerschaftseintritt nach Embryonenübertragung im Rahmen eines späteren Auftauzyklus übertragen. In der ESTEEM-Studie wurden Auftauzyklen im Zeitraum innerhalb von 1 Jahr ab assistierter Reproduktion ausgewertet.

Effektivität

Die Wahrscheinlichkeit für eine Lebendgeburt wurde als Lebendgeburt aus 1. Embryoübertragung und ggfs. weiteren Übertragungen nach Auftau berechnet. Die Wahrscheinlichkeit für einen 1. und 2. Auftauzyklus zum Zweck der Embryoübertragung wurde aus dem Anteil der Patienten mit Auftauzyklus in den beiden Behandlungsarmen errechnet. Patienten mit > 3 Embryonenübertragungen oder 1 Embryonenübertragung außerhalb des Beobachtungszeitraums von 1 Jahr nach Randomisierung sind in dieser Analyse unberücksichtigt, da diese Daten von der ESTEEM-Studie nicht dargestellt wurden. Die Wahrscheinlichkeit für eine erfolgreiche PKD wurde pro Gesamtzahl durchgeführter PKDs berechnet. Alle verwendeten Wahrscheinlichkeiten sind in [Abb. 1] dargestellt.

Zoom Image
Abb. 1 Entscheidungsanalytisches Modell basierend auf der ESTEEM-Studie. Verzweigungen innerhalb des Modells sind durch grüne Kreise gekennzeichnet, Prozentangaben zeigen den Patientenfluss analog zur ESTEEM-Studie. Rote Dreiecke definieren Endpunkte.

#

Kostenszenarien

Um die verschiedenen Abrechnungskonstellationen einer Kinderwunschbehandlung im deutschen Gesundheitssystem abzubilden, wurden direkte Kosten einer assistierten Reproduktion mittels ICSI anhand von drei verschiedenen Kostenszenarien aus Patientensicht simuliert:

  1. GKV: eine Kostenübernahme durch die gesetzliche Krankenkasse (GKV) über „Einheitlichen Bewertungsmaßstab“ (EBM) mit 50%-Kostenbeteiligung an Hormonbehandlung, Monitoring, Follikelpunktion, ICSI und Embryotransfer. Dieses entspricht einer Abrechnung nach Behandlungsplan 10.5 basierend auf der Richtlinie des Gemeinsamen Bundesausschusses der Ärzte und Krankenkassen (50%-Eigenanteil = 1601 €) [13], [14]. Dieser Anteil muss von den Patienten übernommen werden. Die einzelnen Kostenpunkte werden detailliert in einer vorherigen Untersuchung diskutiert [15].

  2. PKV: eine Abrechnung nach der Gebührenordnung für Ärzte (GOÄ) mit häufig notwendigen Steigerungen der einfachen GOÄ-Sätze (= 7681 €) [16]. Diese Kosten werden bei Privatversicherten in Abhängigkeit des Versicherungsvertrags erstattet.

  3. Einfacher GOÄ-Faktor: Abrechnung nach GOÄ mit stets einfachem Steigerungsfaktor (= 4328,94 €). Diese Kosten werden bei Privatversicherten in Abhängigkeit des Versicherungsvertrags erstattet.

Die für eine Kryokonservierung und einem späteren Auftauzyklus anfallenden Kosten werden von der GKV nicht übernommen und sind daher in alle Szenarien basierend auf der Gebührenordnung für Ärzte (GOÄ) integriert (Kryokonservierung = 396 €, Auftauzyklus = 577 €). Die Kosten eines Aborts sind in allen Kostenszenarien unberücksichtigt, da die hierbei anfallenden Kosten unabhängig vom Versicherungsstatus von den Krankenversicherungen übernommen werden.


#

Schwellenwertanalyse

Eine Schwellenwertanalyse für die maximal für eine Kosteneffektivität einer PKD mit Aneuploidiescreening tolerablen Kosten wurde für alle Basisszenarien errechnet. Die Schwellenwerte sind somit die PKD-Kosten, ab denen die zusätzlich anfallenden PKD-Kosten durch den Effekt kompensiert werden. Zudem wurde die theoretisch für eine Kosteneffektivität notwendige Lebendgeburtenrate in der PKD-Gruppe simuliert. Dieses entspricht der theoretisch notwendigen Lebendgeburtenrate, die die PKD-Kosten kompensieren würde. Die Kosten pro verhindertem Abort wurden folgendermaßen errechnet:

Δ Behandlungskosten pro Patient mit vs. ohne PKD multipliziert mit der „number needed to treat (= 15) to reduce the incidence of miscarriage by one“.


#

Kosten für PKD und Sensitivitätsanalyse

Die Durchführung einer PKD und eines Aneuploidiescreenings stellt in allen drei Kostenszenarien eine Selbstzahlerleistung dar, die basierend auf GOÄ abgerechnet wird. Die hierbei anfallenden Kosten ergeben sich aus der Durchführung der Biopsie der Polkörper (mittlere Kosten nach GOÄ 689 €), der Untersuchung des Polkörpers durch einen Facharzt für Humangenetik und aus den Materialkosten für aCGH (= 900 € pro Eizelle). Der Hauptteil der Kosten entsteht durch die Materialkosten für die verwendeten aCGH-Chips sowie Reagenzien (4 Chips für, im Mittel, 10 verfügbare Polkörper). Zu den PKD- und Aneuploidiescreening-Kosten wurde eine Ein-Weg-Sensitivitätsanalyse im Bereich von 0 – 10 000 € mit den Endpunkten Kosten pro Lebendgeburt und Durchschnittskosten pro Patient durchgeführt.


#

Probabilistische Sensitivitätsanalyse

Zur Überprüfung von Unsicherheiten bei den Annahmen der Basisszenarien wurde eine probabilistische Sensitivitätsanalyse (PSA) durchgeführt. Hierbei werden Effekte durch Beta-Verteilungen und Kosten durch LogNormal-Verteilungen ersetzt. Es wurden 1000 Kalkulationen mit variierenden Kosten und Effekten analysiert, welche den empfohlenen Vorgaben für ökonomische Analysen entsprechen [17].

Alle verwendeten Verteilungen sind in [Tab. 1] dargestellt. Für Wahrscheinlichkeiten wurden Beta-Verteilungen angenommen, deren Parameter den in der ESTEEM-Studie beobachteten Zahlen entsprechen. Für die Kosten wurden Lognormal-Verteilungen mit Medianwerten entsprechend den Vorgaben der Basisszenarien angenommen. Für PKD-Kosten von 5801 € und maximale Kosten von 14 000 € in 396 Fällen in der ESTEEM-Studie wurde als 0,5 und 0,99937-Quantil eine Lognormal-Verteilung angenommen. Dadurch ergibt sich eine Standardabweichung des Logarithmus von 0,32 (Variationskoeffizient 33%), was für die übrigen Kosten ebenfalls einen realistischen Bereich für 95% der Werte darstellt ([Tab. 1]).

Tab. 1 Verteilungen der probabilistischen Sensitivitätsanalyse. Hierbei werden Effekte durch Beta-Verteilungen und Kosten durch LogNormal-Verteilungen wiedergegeben. Diese sind nicht identisch mit den Wahrscheinlichkeiten und Kosten der Basisszenarien.

Parameter

Verteilung

Parameter 1

Parameter 2

erwarteter Wert

Referenz

PKD durchgeführt

Beta

180

17

0,91

Verpoest et al. 2018 [11]

PKD erfolgreich

Beta

1006

17

0,98

mindestens 1 Embryonenübertragung PKD

Beta

149

30

0,83

mindestens 1 Embryonenübertragung Kontrollgruppe

Beta

171

13

0,93

Lebendgeburt PKD (1. Embryonenübertragung)

Beta

44

105

0,29

Lebendgeburt PKD (weitere Embryonenübertragungen)

Beta

6

22

0,21

Lebendgeburt Kontrollgruppe (1. Embryonenübertragung)

Beta

38

133

0,22

Lebendgeburt Kontrollgruppe (weitere Embryonenübertragungen)

Beta

7

71

0,9

1. Auftauzyklus PKD

Beta

25

80

0,24

2. Auftauzyklus PKD

Beta

2

18

0,1

1. Auftauzyklus Kontrollgruppe

Beta

55

78

0,41

2. Auftauzyklus Kontrollgruppe

Beta

15

35

0,3

Kosten

Verteilung

Standardabweichung

mindestens 1 Embryonentransfer

Lognormal

  • GKV

7,3

0,32

1558

  • PKV

8,9

7717

  • einfacher GOÄ-Faktor

8,4

4680

kein Embryonentransfer

  • GKV

7,3

0,32

1558

  • PKV

8,9

7717

  • einfacher GOÄ-Faktor

8,3

4235

1. Auftauzyklus

6,7

0,32

855

weitere Auftauzyklen

6,2

0,32

518

PKD

8,6

0,32

5717

Die inkrementellen Kosten zur Vermeidung eines Aborts wurden anhand Multiplikation von Δ Behandlungskosten pro Patient multipliziert mit der „number needed to treat to benefit“ von jeweils 1000 simulierten Szenarien berechnet.


#
#

Ergebnisse

Kosten pro Lebendgeburt und durchschnittliche Kosten pro Patient in den Basisszenarien

Die Durchführung einer PKD mit Aneuploidiescreening erhöht die Kosten pro Lebendgeburt in allen drei Kostenszenarien deutlich. So sind die Kosten pro Lebendgeburt im Basisszenario um + 17 999 € (GKV), + 16 370 € (PKV) und + 17 378 € (einfacher GOÄ-Faktor) in der PKD-Gruppe erhöht.

Auch die durchschnittlichen Kosten pro Patient sind bei Durchführung einer PKD deutlich höher. So kommt es zu einem Anstieg der Kosten pro Patient im Basisszenario von + 4914 € (GKV), + 4895 € (PKV) und + 4923 € (einfacher GOÄ-Faktor) in der PKD-Gruppe. [Abb. 2] zeigt Kosten pro Lebendgeburt und pro Patient in den jeweiligen Kostenszenarien.

Zoom Image
Abb. 2 Durch PKD kommt es zu höheren Kosten pro Lebendgeburt (a) und pro Patient (b) in allen Kostenszenarien in den Basisszenarien.

#

Inkrementelle Kosten Reduktion Abortrate

Die inkrementellen Kosten zur Vermeidung eines einzigen Aborts durch zusätzliche Durchführung einer PKD, basierend auf den Annahmen der Basisszenarien, sind 73 708 € (GKV), 73 434 € (PKV) und 73 980 € (einfacher GOÄ-Faktor).


#

Sensitivitätsanalyse und Schwellenwertanalyse

Eine Ein-Weg-Sensitivitätsanalyse der PKD-Kosten im Bereich von 0 € bis 10 000 € mit dem Endpunkt Kosten pro Lebendgeburt und Durchschnittskosten pro Patient zeigt eine lineare Abhängigkeit der Kosten pro Lebendgeburt und der Kosten pro Patient in Abhängigkeit von den PKD-Kosten ([Abb. 3]).

Eine Schwellenwertanalyse der PKD-Kosten mit dem Endpunkt Kosten pro Lebendgeburt zeigt, dass eine PKD im GKV- und einfachen GOÄ-Faktor-Kostenszenario erst deutlich unter 1000 € kosteneffektiv wird (GKV: 561 €, einfacher GOÄ-Faktor: 743 €). Hingegen wird eine PKD im PKV-Kostenszenario ab 1037 € PKD-Kosten kosteneffektiv. [Abb. 3] zeigt die Schnittpunkte der Kosten von PKD und der Gruppe ohne PKD als Schwellenwerte zur Kosteneffektivität (d. h. als PKD-Kosten, ab denen die zusätzlich anfallenden PKD-Kosten durch den Effekt kompensiert werden) in den jeweiligen Kostenszenarien.

Zoom Image
Abb. 3 Sensitivitätsanalyse zur Abhängigkeit von Kosten pro Lebendgeburt (a) und pro Patient von PKD-Kosten (b). Die Schnittpunkte definieren die Schwellenwerte der Kosteneffektivität von PKD und der Gruppe ohne PKD.

Eine Simulation des notwendigerweise in der PKD-Gruppe zu erreichenden Anstiegs der LGR, die zu einer Kosteneffektivität von PKD führen und somit die zusätzlichen PKD-Kosten kompensieren würde), zeigte pro Embryotransfer einen theoretisch notwendigen Anstieg der LGR von + > 47% (exakte LGR in diesem Modell nicht berechenbar, da sich Verzweigungen im entscheidungsanalytischen Modell auf > 100% addieren würden) (GKV), + 14% (PKV) bzw. + 26%, („einfacher GOÄ-Faktor“), ab der PKD kosteneffektiv werden würde.


#

Probabilistische Sensitivitätsanalyse (PSA)

Eine PSA zeigte für 1000 Kalkulationen keine Kosteneffektivität für die PKD-Gruppe in allen drei Kostenszenarien.

Die inkrementellen Kosten zur Vermeidung eines Aborts sind bei 1000 Kalkulationen im Median 63 686 € (95%-Konfidenzintervall [KI] 60 030 – 67 587 €) (GKV), 64 504 € (95%-KI 61 983 – 68 549 €) (PKV) und 66 117 € (95%-KI 63 150 – 69 334 €) (einfacher GOÄ-Faktor).


#
#

Diskussion

Die vorliegende Arbeit zeigt, dass Patientinnen im fortgeschrittenen reproduktiven Alter mit Kinderwunsch und Anspruch auf eine 50%-Kostenerstattung, die einen Behandlungszyklus einer assistierte Reproduktion mittels ICSI durchlaufen (ggf. mit Kryokonservierung und nachfolgenden Auftauzyklen), im Mittel rund 8600 Euro an Eigenmitteln pro Lebendgeburt beisteuern. Die in der ESTEEM-Studie beobachtete LGR ist dabei gut mit den im Deutschen IVF-Register für diese Altersgruppe dokumentierten Behandlungsausgängen vergleichbar. Durch zusätzliche Anwendung einer PKD mit aCGH steigen diese Kosten beträchtlich an. Die vorliegende Kosteneffektivitätsanalyse aus Patientensicht zeigt deutlich erhöhte Kosten pro Lebendgeburt für ein Aneuploidiescreening mittels PKD und aCGH in allen drei Kostenszenarien. Eine Schwellenwertanalyse der maximal tolerablen Kosten einer PKD, die zu gleichen Kosten pro Lebendgeburt wie in der Kontrollgruppe führen würden, zeigt Ergebnisse (561 €, 1037 € bzw. 743 €), die deutlich unterhalb den nach GÖA für 5 Oozyten (= durchschnittlich untersuchte Oozytenzahl in der ESTEEM-Studie) anfallenden Kosten für eine aCGH liegen. Rezente technologische Entwicklungen haben bereits zu einer Kostensenkung der genetischen Diagnostik geführt. Die hier vorliegende Untersuchung erlaubt eine Abschätzung der Kostendimension, die für eine Kostenneutralität von PKD aus Patientensicht tolerabel wäre. An dieser Stelle ist jedoch kritisch zu erwähnen, dass die Biopsie der Polkörper nur im Rahmen einer ICSI-Behandlung möglich ist, die nicht nur teurer als eine IVF-Behandlung ist, sondern die darüber hinaus Paaren mit schwerer männlicher Subfertilität vorbehalten bleiben sollte. Des weiteren zeigt sich eine enorme Kostendiskrepanz zwischen dem GKV- und PKV-Kostenszenario, was durch die grundlegend unterschiedlichen Abrechnungsmodalitäten bei GKV (Abrechnung nach Komplexziffer) und PKV-Patienten (Abrechnung nach GOÄ) bedingt ist. Diese Diskrepanz ist ein häufiger Kritikpunkt im deutschen Gesundheitswesen [18].

Das entscheidungsanalytische Modell wurde aus Patientensicht modelliert und berücksichtigt die für einen Abort (relatives Risiko PKD: 0,48) oder für eine Geminigravidität (relatives Risiko PKD: 0,54) anfallenden Kosten nicht, was sich zuungunsten der PKD-Gruppe auswirkt. Allerdings zeigt eine weitere, eigene Kostenanalyse unter Berücksichtigung von Abortkosten ebenfalls keine Kosteneffektivität von PKD in vier verschiedenen internationalen Kostenszenarien [19].

Eine Berechnung der inkrementellen PKD-Kosten, die anfallen würden, um einen einzigen Abort zu verhindern, zeigt eine Kostendimension (mind. 73 434 €), die den Einsatz der PKD zur Abortreduktion aus ökonomischer Sicht unrealistisch erscheinen lässt.

Zusammenfassend ist ein Aneuploidiescreening anhand PKD mit aCGH, angesichts der hohen Kosten für die genetische Testung, unter Kosten-Wirksamkeits-Aspekten nicht zur routinehaften Anwendung geeignet. Limitationen dieser Kostenanalyse ist u. a. der fehlende Einschluss von indirekten medizinischen Kosten (beispielsweise Kosten für Arbeitsausfall durch einen Abort etc.), die extrem variabel und schwierig zu kalkulieren sind. Eine Änderung des Ergebnisses dieser Kostenanalyse durch Berücksichtigung von indirekten medizinischen Kosten erscheint jedoch aufgrund der großen Kostendiskrepanz zwischen PKD-Gruppe und Kontrollgruppe unwahrscheinlich.


#
#

Conflict of Interest/Interessenkonflikt

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.


Correspondence/Korrespondenzadresse

Prof. Dr. med. M.Sc. Georg Griesinger
Sektion für gynäkologische Endokrinologie und Reproduktionsmedizin
Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein
Campus Lübeck
Ratzeburger Allee 160
23538 Lübeck
Germany   


  
Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Decision tree model based on the ESTEEM trial. Nodes within the model are marked by green circles, percentages show the patient flow analogously to the ESTEEM trial. Red triangles define endpoints.
Zoom Image
Fig. 2 Carrying out PTG-A results in higher costs per live birth (a) and per patient (b) in all cost combinations in the base-case scenarios.
Zoom Image
Fig. 3 Sensitivity analysis for the dependence of the cost per live birth (a) and per patient on the cost of PGT-A (b). The points of intersection define the threshold values for cost-effectiveness of PGT-A.
Zoom Image
Abb. 1 Entscheidungsanalytisches Modell basierend auf der ESTEEM-Studie. Verzweigungen innerhalb des Modells sind durch grüne Kreise gekennzeichnet, Prozentangaben zeigen den Patientenfluss analog zur ESTEEM-Studie. Rote Dreiecke definieren Endpunkte.
Zoom Image
Abb. 2 Durch PKD kommt es zu höheren Kosten pro Lebendgeburt (a) und pro Patient (b) in allen Kostenszenarien in den Basisszenarien.
Zoom Image
Abb. 3 Sensitivitätsanalyse zur Abhängigkeit von Kosten pro Lebendgeburt (a) und pro Patient von PKD-Kosten (b). Die Schnittpunkte definieren die Schwellenwerte der Kosteneffektivität von PKD und der Gruppe ohne PKD.