Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2013; 17(03): 279-284
DOI: 10.7162/S1809-97772013000300008
Original Article
Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Characteristics of polypoid lesions in patients undergoing microsurgery of the larynx

Jorge Massaaki Ido Filho
1  ENT doctor recognized by ABORL (Physician at Hospital IPO and at the ENT Department of HC/UFPR
,
Bettina Carvalho
2  ENT doctor recognized by ABORL (Fellow at Hospital IPO
,
Flavio Massao Mizoguchi
3  ENT doctor recognized by ABORL (Physician at Hospital IPO
,
Guilherme Simas do Amaral Catani
1  ENT doctor recognized by ABORL (Physician at Hospital IPO and at the ENT Department of HC/UFPR
,
Evaldo Dacheux de Macedo Filho
1  ENT doctor recognized by ABORL (Physician at Hospital IPO and at the ENT Department of HC/UFPR
,
Osvaldo Malafaia
4  PhD in Medical Anatomy (1976). Professor associated with the postgraduate program in Surgical Principles at the Faculdade Evangelica do Parana.
,
Henrique Jorge Stahlke Jr.
5  PhD in Clinical Surgery in the postgraduate program at UFPR (2002). Professor and Coordinator of Vascular Surgery at HC/UFPR.
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

24 January 2013

09 March 2013

Publication Date:
21 January 2014 (online)

  

Summary

Introduction: Dysphonia is the main symptom of lesions that affect the vocal tract. Many of those lesions may require surgical treatment. Polyps are one of the most common forms of vocal cord lesions and the most prevalent indication for laryngeal microsurgery. There are different types of polyps, and their different characteristics can indicate different prognosis and treatments.

Aim: To conduct a comparative study of polypoid lesions (angiomatous and gelatinous) in patients undergoing laryngeal microsurgery via an electronic protocol.

Method: We prospectively evaluated 93 patients diagnosed with vocal fold polyps; the polyps were classified as angiomatous or gelatinous.

Results: In total, 93 patients undergoing laryngeal microsurgery were diagnosed with vocal fold polyps. Of these, 63 (64.74%) had angiomatous and 30 (32.26%) gelatinous polyps. Most patients with angiomatous polyps were men; their polyps were frequently of medium size, positioned in the middle third of the vocal fold, and accompanied by minimal structural alterations (MSA). In contrast, the majority of patients with gelatinous polyps were women; their polyps were smaller, positioned in the middle and posterior third of the vocal fold, and were not accompanied by MSA. Both types of polyps were more frequently located on the right vocal fold.

Conclusion: Angiomatous polyps were more frequently encountered than gelatinous polyps. In addition, correlations between polyp type and sex, polyp size, position, location, and the presence of MSA were observed. Different surgical techniques were used, but the postoperative results were similar and satisfactory after speech therapy.