Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2013; 17(03): 274-278
DOI: 10.7162/S1809-97772013000300007
Original Article
Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Clinical and fiberoptic endoscopic assessment of swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Marina Rodrigues Bueno Macri
1  Speech Therapist. Masters in Communication Disorders from the University of Paraná Tuiuti.
,
Jair Mendes Marques
2  Degree in Mathematics. Doctorate in Geodetic Sciences from the Federal University of Paraná (HC-UFPR).
,
Rosane Sampaio Santos
3  Speech Therapist. Student Doctorate in Internal Medicine from the HC-UFPR.
,
Ana Maria Furkim
4  Speech Therapist. Doctorate in Human Communication Disorders from the Federal University of Sao Paulo.
,
Irinei Melek
5  Doctor. Pulmonologist.
,
Daniel Rispoli
6  Doctor. Otolaryngologist.
,
Maria Cristina de Alencar Nunes
7  Speech Therapist. Student Doctorate in Internal Medicine from the HC-UFPR.
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

17 January 2013

07 April 2013

Publication Date:
21 January 2014 (online)

  

Summary

Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible obstruction of pulmonary airflow.

Aim: To characterize swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and correlate the findings with the degree chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and smoking.

Method: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 19 patients (12 men and 7 women; age range, 50–85 years) with confirmed medical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was performed in 2 stages (clinical evaluation and functional assessment using nasolaryngofibroscopy) on the same day. During both stages, vital signs were checked by medical personnel.

Results: Clinical evaluation of swallowing in all patients showed the clinical signs of cough. The findings of nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted subsequent intraoral escape in 5 patients (26.5%). No patient had tracheal aspiration. There was no association of subsequent intraoral escape with degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking.

Conclusion: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, there was a prevalence of oral dysphagia upon swallowing and nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted the finding of subsequent intraoral escape. There was no correlation between intraoral escape and the degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking.