CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurosci Rural Pract 2017; 08(S 01): S013-S019
DOI: 10.4103/jnrp.jnrp_21_17
Original Article
Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice

High Frequency of Depressive Symptoms among Adults with Epilepsy: Results from a Hospital-based Study

Syam C. Chandrasekharan
MBBS Student, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
,
Vikas Menon
1  Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
,
Vaibhav Wadwekar
2  Department of Neurology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
,
Pradeep Pankajakshan Nair
2  Department of Neurology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
03 September 2019 (online)

ABSTRACT

Context: Assessment of comorbid burden of depression and associated factors among adult people living with epilepsy (PWE) has the potential to inform clinical evaluation and management to improve outcomes. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine frequency of depressive symptoms and factors associated with it among PWE attending a tertiary care hospital. Setting and Design: This was a cross-sectional observational study conducted in the outpatient clinic of a tertiary care center. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients with epilepsy were recruited between May 2016 and August 2016. For assessing depression, Tamil validated version of Patient Health Questionnaire-12 was used. Frequency of depression and its association with various sociodemographic and clinical factors were assessed. Statistical Analysis Used: Student t-test and Chi-square test for univariate analysis and logistic regression for multivariate analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 150 subjects, 89 (59.3%) were males. Generalized tonic–clonic seizures were present in 131 people (87.3%). Genetic and unknown epilepsies contributed higher proportion (44.7%) as compared to structural epilepsies (37.3%). Majority (88%) were on one or two antiepileptic drugs. Thirty-one people (20.3%) had less than one seizure per year. Depressive symptoms were present in 95 patients (63.3%). In multivariate regression analysis, secondary generalized seizures and seizure frequency >1/month emerged as significant predictors of depression ([OR]: 5.48 [95% (CI): 1.35–22.28] and OR: 2.53 [95% CI: 1.11–5.75], respectively). Conclusion: Depression is prevalent in a majority of adult PWE. Hence, a routine screening for depression as part of comprehensive epilepsy care is advisable for PWE attending the outpatient clinic.