CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Indian J Radiol Imaging 2018; 28(02): 268-269
DOI: 10.4103/ijri.IJRI_85_18
Letters to the Editor

Author’s Reply

Ashu S Bhalla
Departments of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
A Das
Departments of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
P Naranje
Departments of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
A Goyal
Departments of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
R Guleria
Departments of Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Disorders, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Gopi C Khilnani
Departments of Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Disorders, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor: Financial support and sponsorship Nil.

Sir,

We agree with the pertinent remarks of the authors and appreciate their interest in our article. Differentiating tuberculosis from sarcoidosis with absolute certainty is difficult because of overlapping clinical and radiological features.[1] In such cases, tissue sampling is usually done; nevertheless, this distinction may not be achieved in all cases despite sampling. Even with the addition of microbiological investigations, the diagnostic yield is at best around 60%.[2],[3],[4],[5]

The purpose of this review article was to highlight the imaging similarities and differentiating features between the two entities with only a brief description of clinical and laboratory correlates. We did mention in the imaging-based algorithm proposed in our article about the use of microbiological test—CBNAAT (Gene Xpert) in initial sputum evaluation which is a part of RNTCP guidelines for assessment of tuberculosis.[6] In general, the investigation is routinely performed on any specimen obtained in a suspected case of tuberculosis, for example, bronchoalveolar lavage/fine needle aspiration/biopsy specimens. However, discussion of the implications of it being positive or negative in correlation with the pathological presence or absence of non-caseating granulomas is beyond the range of an imaging-based discussion on sarcoidosis/tuberculosis. Microbiological and pathological evaluation of this spectrum of granulomatous diseases is a complex topic in itself and requires a thorough search and analysis of the literature. Hence, inclusion of the same is beyond the purview and intent of the current article.



Publication History

Publication Date:
26 July 2021 (online)

© 2018. Indian Radiological Association. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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