CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Eur J Dent 2014; 08(02): 254-260
DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.130626
Original Article
Dental Investigation Society

Antimicrobial activity of cationic peptides in endodontic procedures

Sofi Beaula Winfred
1   Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Gowri Meiyazagan
1   Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Jiban J. Panda
2   Malaria Research Laboratory, International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India
,
Venkateshbabu Nagendrababu
3   Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dental Science, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Kandaswamy Deivanayagam
3   Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dental Science, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Virander S. Chauhan
2   Malaria Research Laboratory, International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India
,
Ganesh Venkatraman
1   Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
25 September 2019 (online)

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and biofilm inhibition activity of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) against microbes such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans which are involved in endodontic infections. Materials and Methods: Agar diffusion test was done to determine the activity of peptides. The morphological changes in E. faecalis and reduction in biofilm formation after treatment with peptides were observed using scanning electron microscope. The efficacy of peptides using an ex vivo dentinal model was determined by polymerase chain reaction and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Platelet aggregation was done to determine the biocompatibility of peptides. Results: Among 11 peptides, two of the amphipathic cationic peptides were found to be highly active against E. faecalis, S. aureus, C. albicans. Efficacy results using dentinal tubule model showed significant reduction in microbial load at 400 μm depth. The peptides were also biocompatible. Conclusion: These results suggest that synthetic AMPs have the potential to be developed as antibacterial agents against microorganisms involved in dental infections and thus could prevent the spread and persistence of endodontic infections improving treatment outcomes and teeth preservation.