CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Eur J Dent 2014; 08(02): 197-204
DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.130600
Original Article
Dental Investigation Society

Evaluation of nasal morphology in predicting vertical and sagittal maxillary skeletal discrepancies’

Mandava Prasad
1   Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
,
Nellore Chaitanya
1   Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
,
Karnati Praveen Kumar Reddy
1   Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
,
Ashok Kumar Talapaneni
1   Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
,
Vijaya Bhaskar Myla
1   Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
,
Sharath Kumar Shetty
2   Department of Orthodontics, KVG Dental College, Sullia, Karnataka, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
24 September 2019 (online)

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the relationship between nasal morphology and maxillary skeletal pattern. The clinical significance was to emphasize the importance of role of nasal pattern in diagnosis and treatment planning. Materials and Methods: The sample included the pre-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of 180 South Indian adults (94 women, 86 men), aged 18 to 28 years. Six maxillary and six nasal soft tissue parameters were measured. Pearson correlation coefficients and Analysis of variance were used for statistical analyses. Results: There were significant correlations between maxillary vertical and sagittal, skeletal and soft tissue parameters. The Mean and standard deviations were correlated between low insignificant range to high significant levels with nasal length, nasal depth and columella convexity. Nasal length also showed significant correlation with inclination of palatal plane. Significant influence of gender was seen on nasal length, nasal depth, columella convexity and nasal tip angle. A statistically significant difference was seen regarding nasal length between males and females, with nasal length being more in males (50.26 ± 4.18) than in females (48.86 ± 3.45), nasal depth being more in males (18.64 ± 2.56) than in females (16.63 ± 2.16), columella convexity being greater in males (4.31 ± 1.26) than in females (3.41 ± 1.13), nasolabial angle decreased in males (87.26° ±13.79°) than in females (89.38° ±15.72°) and nasal tip angle being more in females (80.18° ±9.44°) than in males (73.60° ±10.24°). There was no statistically significant difference in nasal hump between males (-2.01 ± 1.76) and females (-2.02 ± 1.62). Conclusion: Long nose with increased nasal prominence were seen with increase in the anteroposterior length and vertical height of maxilla. Male and female genders had a varied amount of nasal length, nasal depth and columella convexity along with nasal tip angle.