CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Eur J Dent 2014; 08(02): 160-165
DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.130586
Original Article
Dental Investigation Society

Microhardness and color monitoring of nanofilled resin composite after bleaching and staining

Isabel Cristina G. Bandeira de Andrade
1   Department of Restorative Dentistry, Regional University of Blumenau, Blumenau, SC, Brazil
,
Roberta Tarkany Basting
2   Department of Restorative Dentistry, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Dental Research Center, Campinas, SP, Brazil
,
José Augusto Rodrigues
3   Department of Restorative Dentistry School of Dentistry, Guarulhos University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
,
Flávia Lucisano Botelho do Amaral
2   Department of Restorative Dentistry, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Dental Research Center, Campinas, SP, Brazil
,
Cecilia Pedroso Turssi
2   Department of Restorative Dentistry, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Dental Research Center, Campinas, SP, Brazil
,
Fabiana Mantovani Gomes França
2   Department of Restorative Dentistry, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Dental Research Center, Campinas, SP, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
24 September 2019 (online)

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of staining solutions on microhardness and shade changes of a nanofilled resin composite, which had been previously in contact with bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 disk-shaped specimens (10 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated with a nanofilled resin (Filtek Supreme) and photocured with a Light Emission Diode (LED) unit and then allocated into three groups to be bleached with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents or a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) product. Following bleaching, specimens within each group were subdivided into three groups to be immersed in coffee, red wine or distilled water. Microhardness and color were monitored at baseline, after bleaching and after staining. Results: Analysis of variance for split-plot design showed lower microhardness values when the composite had been in contact with HP (P < 0.0001). The specimens immersed in red wine and coffee provided lower microhardness values than those immersed in distilled water, regardless of the bleaching agent to which the composites were previously exposed. Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests demonstrated that the composite was lighter after bleaching with a 35% HP agent (P < 0.0500). Conclusion: The composite was darker as a result of being immersed either in red wine or coffee, regardless of the bleaching agent.