CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Indian J Med Paediatr Oncol 2015; 36(04): 261-264
DOI: 10.4103/0971-5851.171552
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A single center experience with Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster-95 protocol

Venkatraman Radhakrishnan
Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Sumant Gupta
Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Prasanth Ganesan
Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Rejiv Rajendranath
Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Trivadi S. Ganesan
Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Kamalalayan Raghavan Rajalekshmy
Department of Pathology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
,
Tenali Gnana Sagar
Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
› Institutsangaben
Financial support and sponsorship Nil.

Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of data on the outcome following the treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight consecutive patients with ALL <30 years of age diagnosed between January 2005 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated modified Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster 95 protocol. Event-free survival (EFS) was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and variables were compared using log-rank test. Results: The EFS was 63.4% at a median follow-up was 32.7 months. On univariate analysis National Cancer Institute (NCI) risk stratification, sex, white blood cell count, day 8 blast clearance, and income were significantly associated with EFS. However, on multivariate analysis only female sex (P = 0.01) and day 8 blast clearance (P = 0.006) were significantly associated with EFS. Seventy-four of 238 (31%) patients had recurrent leukemia. The common sites of relapse were bone marrow in 55/74 (75%) patients and central nervous system in 11/74 (20%) patients. Conclusion: Compared to western data, there was an increased proportion of NCI high-risk patients and T-cell immunophenotype in our study. There has been an improvement in outcome of patients with ALL at our center over the last 2 decades. Female sex and clearance of blast in peripheral blood by day 8 of induction was associated with better EFS.



Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
12. Juli 2021 (online)

© 2015. Indian Society of Medical and Paediatric Oncology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.)

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