J Am Acad Audiol 2020; 31(04): 257-261
DOI: 10.3766/jaaa.18087
Research Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Subjective Age in the Oldest Old: What is the Association with Disability and Sensory Impairment?

Sarah Schroyen
1  Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR 1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
,
Céeline Meillon
1  Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR 1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
,
Manon Marquet
1  Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR 1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
,
Jean-François Dartigues
1  Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR 1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
,
Karine Pérès
1  Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR 1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
,
Hélène Amieva
1  Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR 1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
15 April 2020 (online)

Abstract

Background and Purpose Disability and sensory impairment are particularly pronounced among the oldest old population (80 years and older). Considering these specificities, we analyzed the association of such parameters with subjective age, a strong predictor of health-related outcomes. We assumed that greater disability and sensory impairment (hearing and visual) would be linked with an older subjective age.

Research Design Prospective population-based study.

Study Sample Data were gathered from the 27th year follow-up of the PAQUID cohort, visit where the question on subjective age was collected. Our sample included 75 participants older than 93 years, with a mean age of 96 years.

Data Collection and Analysis Disability was assessed with Activities of Daily Living and sensory impairments by asking participants if they have visual or hearing difficulties. A multiple linear regression model was performed with subjective age as the dependent variable. Independent variables were functional disability and visual and hearing impairments.

Results On average, the participants felt 12 years younger than their actual age. Multiple regression analyses controlled for age, gender, education, depression, and dementia indicated that self-reported hearing loss (p = 0.03) was associated with an older subjective age, whereas no significant associations were observed for disability (p = 0.42) and self-reported visual loss (p = 0.18).

Conclusions Hearing impairment, in contrast to visual impairment and disability, is associated with feeling older. These results are discussed in light of health consequences and age stigma carried by hearing impairment.