Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2011; 24(04): 279-284
DOI: 10.3415/VCOT-10-04-0051
Original Research
Schattauer GmbH

Nerve growth factor concentrations in the synovial fluid from healthy dogs and dogs with secondary osteoarthritis

M. Isola
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Italy
,
V. Ferrari
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Italy
,
A. Miolo
2  Scientific Information and Documentation Centre (CeDIS) Innovet Italia Srl, Saccolongo (Padua), Italy
,
F. Stabile
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Italy
,
D. Bernardini
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Italy
,
P. Carnier
3  Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Italy
,
R. Busetto
1  Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received:06 April 2010

Accepted:25 April 2011

Publication Date:
21 December 2017 (online)

Summary

Objective: To measure the concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial fluid from normal dogs and dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) secondary to common joint disorders.

Methods: Nerve growth factor synovial concentrations were measured by ELISA assay in 50 dogs divided into three groups: 12 healthy, 16 affected by acute lameness within seven days before enrolment, and 22 with chronic lameness persisting by more than one month before enrolment and accompanied by radiological signs of OA. Both acute and chronic lameness were secondary to orthopaedic diseases involving the shoulder, elbow and stifle joints. Nerve growth factor synovial concentrations were compared between means for healthy and acute groups and between the three groups using an F-test. Significance level was set at p ±0.05.

Results: Nerve growth factor was detected in all canine synovial fluid samples. However, the mean synovial NGF concentration of healthy dogs (3.65 ± 2.18 pg/ml) was not significantly different from the mean value in dogs with acute lameness (6.45 ± 2.45 pg/ml) (p ± 0.79). Conversely, the mean synovial NGF concentration in dogs with chronic lameness (20.19 ± 17.51 pg/ml) was found to be significantly higher than that found in healthy dogs (p ±0.01).

Clinical significance: This study demonstrates for the first time the presence of NGF in canine synovial fluid and its increased concentrations in dogs with chronic lameness compared to healthy dogs and dogs with acute lameness. The association between chronic lameness and raised synovial concentrations may suggest an involvement of NGF in OA inflammation and chronic pain.