J Pediatr Intensive Care 2013; 02(02): 085-088
DOI: 10.3233/PIC-13055
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

A forgotten alternative: Bromides for refractory status epilepticus

Nir Horesh
a  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
,
Marina Rubinstein
a  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
,
Bruria Ben-Zeev
a  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
,
Gideon Paret
a  Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

12 August 2012

15 December 2012

Publication Date:
28 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

We present the cases of a 1-month-old infant diagnosed as having malignant migrating partial epilepsy of infancy and a 2-month-old infant with Ohtahara syndrome, who both presented with severe refractory status epilepticus and were treated with potassium bromide when all other antiepileptic drugs failed. Appropriate augmentation of the dosage of potassium bromide led to reduction in the frequency and duration of seizures in both patients. There was a notable reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures in both cases, with no apparent side effects. Potassium bromide was of significant benefit for seizure reduction in two infants with intractable seizures. It could be used safely and within a short period. Potassium bromide should be considered as a relatively safe therapeutic option for infants and children with severe intractable seizures when other antiepileptic drugs fail to control the seizures.