Journal of Pediatric Neurology 2014; 12(03): 127-135
DOI: 10.3233/JPN-140652
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

Sleep complaints in cerebral palsy and/or epilepsy: A pediatric sleep questionnaire study

Xue Ming
a  Department of Neurosciences and Neurology, Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA
b  Sleep Medicine Center, New Jersey Neuroscience Institute, JFK Medical Center, Seton Hall University, Edison, NJ, USA
,
Jayoung Pak
a  Department of Neurosciences and Neurology, Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA
,
Martha A. Mulvey
a  Department of Neurosciences and Neurology, Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA
,
Timothy O'Sullivan
c  Department of Biology, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, USA
,
Chitra Reddy
d  Department of Pediatrics, Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA
,
Joseph Schwab
d  Department of Pediatrics, Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA
,
Keith W. Pecor
c  Department of Biology, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, USA
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

13 January 2014

25 April 2014

Publication Date:
30 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

This study determined whether common symptoms of sleep disorders were more prevalent in children with cerebral palsy (CP), epilepsy, and with CP comorbid with epilepsy. The pediatric sleep questionnaire was administered to the guardians of healthy control children (n = 69), children with CP (n = 23), epilepsy (n = 106), and CP comorbid with epilepsy (n = 29). Scores on symptoms of sleep disordered breathing, insomnia, and excessive daytime sleepiness were analyzed separately and compared among the groups using Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance by ranks. In comparison to controls, the CP group had a significantly higher prevalence of sleep disordered breathing, insomnia, and excessive daytime sleepiness, and the CP comorbid with epilepsy group exhibited significantly higher prevalence of sleep disordered breathing and insomnia. The epilepsy group showed significantly higher prevalence of sleep disordered breathing than controls. The sleep complaints were more common in this cohort of children with CP and/or epilepsy that deserve clinical attention for proper diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.