J Pediatr Infect Dis 2013; 08(03): 117-123
DOI: 10.3233/JPI-130390
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

Seroprevalence of antibodies against vaccine preventable diseases in internationally adopted children

Arianna Dondi
a  Pediatric Unit, Department of Gynecological, Obstetrical and Pediatric Sciences, Bologna, Italy
b  Dermatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Aging and Nephrological Diseases, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
,
Federica Bellini
a  Pediatric Unit, Department of Gynecological, Obstetrical and Pediatric Sciences, Bologna, Italy
,
Giampaolo Ricci
a  Pediatric Unit, Department of Gynecological, Obstetrical and Pediatric Sciences, Bologna, Italy
,
Arianna Giannetti
a  Pediatric Unit, Department of Gynecological, Obstetrical and Pediatric Sciences, Bologna, Italy
,
Valentina Piccinno
a  Pediatric Unit, Department of Gynecological, Obstetrical and Pediatric Sciences, Bologna, Italy
,
Andrea Pession
a  Pediatric Unit, Department of Gynecological, Obstetrical and Pediatric Sciences, Bologna, Italy
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

09 October 2012

13 December 2012

Publication Date:
28 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

We investigated whether differences in the immunization status of adoptees might be related to their region of origin. 151 internationally-adopted children (35.1% from Latin America; 32.4% from Eastern Europe and ex-Soviet Union countries; 21.2% from South-east Asia and 11.3% from Africa; mean age 4.5 years) were assessed with 45 days of arrival in Italy. 26.5% of patients had invalid, or no, documentation of previous immunizations. Valid records were available for 88.7% and 87.8% of children from Latin America and Eastern Europe respectively, but in only 43.8% and 41.2% of children from South-east Asia and Africa. 76/131 (58.0%) of children tested had protective anti-HBs antibody titres. Protective titres of anti-tetanus, -diphtheria and -pertussis antibodies were found in 59.7%, 80.4% and 41.5% of children, respectively. Antibodies against measles, mumps and rubella were found in 77.1%, 53.4% and 76.7% respectively among children older than 12 months. Considerable differences in immunization status exist between adoptees coming from different regions. Evaluation of their immune status is necessary so that they can be properly immunized as a result of differences in immunization schedule and concerns about vaccination records and effectiveness of vaccines received.