J Pediatr Infect Dis 2012; 07(02): 049-053
DOI: 10.3233/JPI-120350
Guest Editorial
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

Bridging the 10/90 gap: Can Bangladesh provide a developing world model for influenza and pneumonia research?

Harunor Rashid
a  National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases, The Children's Hospital at Westmead and The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
,
Gulam Khandaker
a  National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases, The Children's Hospital at Westmead and The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
,
Mohammad A. Muhit
b  University of South Asia, Dhaka, Bangladesh
,
Robert Booy
a  National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases, The Children's Hospital at Westmead and The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
c  Sydney Emerging Infections and Biosecurity Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

10 October 2012

30 October 2012

Publication Date:
28 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

Despite the fact that developing countries carry more than 90 global disease burden, only a small fraction of global medical research addresses their problems. It is interesting to note that even in the field of acute respiratory tract infections, a leading cause of mortality in poor settings, there has been disproportionately little research performed in developing countries. Using Bangladesh as an example, we discuss how clinical trials to address the most important health problems of the developing world (that are also of relevance to the developed world) have been and can continue to be conducted in resource poor countries. To start with, we propose to conduct, in partnership with colleagues from resource rich countries, an influenza vaccine trial in Bangladesh to assess the efficacy of trivalent influenza vaccine, with and without the addition of supplementary measures like the promotion of hand hygiene in reducing pneumonia mortality among children under 5 years of age. Such research may produce a win-win situation for both developed and developing countries.