Thromb Haemost 2017; 117(07): 1249-1257
DOI: 10.1160/TH16-12-0911
60th Anniversary
Schattauer GmbH

Platelet receptors as therapeutic targets: Past, present and future

Janina Jamasbi
1  Institute for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany
,
Keng Ayabe
2  Department of Medicine (Cardiology), Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
,
Shinya Goto
2  Department of Medicine (Cardiology), Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
,
Bernhard Nieswandt
3  Experimental Biomedicine, University Hospital and Rudolf Virchow Center, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Karlheinz Peter
4  Atherothrombosis and Vascular Biology, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia
,
Wolfgang Siess
1  Institute for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany
5  DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Financial Support: SG is supported by grants from Scientific Research in Japan (24390202,050452092), a grant for the next-generation supercomputer Research and Development program supported by RIKEN a grant for Biomedical Engineering Research from the Nakatani Foundation of measuring technologies in biomedical engineering, Sanofi, and Pfizer. KP is supported by a Principal Research Fellowship of the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. WS is supported by grants from the Bayerische Forschungsstiftung (AZ 1145–14), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB1123/B08), and the August-Lenz foundation.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 05 December 2016

Accepted after major revision: 08 April 2017

Publication Date:
28 November 2017 (online)

Summary

Anti-platelet drugs reduce arterial thrombosis after plaque rupture and erosion, prevent stent thrombosis and are used to prevent and treat myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke. Some of them may also be helpful in treating less frequent diseases such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The present concise review aims to cover current and future developments of anti-platelet drugs interfering with the interaction of von Willebrand factor (VWF) with glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, and directed against GPVI, GPIIb/IIIa (integrin αIIbβ3), the thrombin receptor PAR-1, and the ADP receptor P2Y12. The high expectations of having novel antiplatelet drugs which selectively inhibit arterial thrombosis without interfering with normal haemostasis could possibly be met in the near future.