Semin Liver Dis 2007; 27(3): 295-311
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-985074
Copyright © 2007 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

The “C” of Viral Hepatitis in Children

Michael R. Narkewicz1 , Roniel Cabrera2 , Regino P. González-Peralta3
  • 1Pediatric Liver Center, Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, University of Colorado School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital, Denver, Colorado
  • 2Section of Hepatobiliary Diseases, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
  • 3Pediatric Hepatology and Liver Transplantation, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
08 August 2007 (online)

ABSTRACT

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major global health problem. The incidence of transfusion-related HCV infection has markedly decreased, and perinatal transmission has become the most important route of viral spread in children. Perinatally acquired HCV infection is generally a benign condition, but severe liver disease can occur. Little is known about the risk factors for the progression of liver disease in children, and few well-designed pediatric clinical trials have been conducted. Therefore, the decision to treat (or not) children with this viral pathogen is currently a contentious endeavor. Herein, we describe the virus and its life cycle and summarize our current understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of perinatally acquired infection and review current and future therapy of HCV infection in children.

REFERENCES

Regino P González-Peralta, M.D. 

Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

P.O. Box 100296, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610