Semin Speech Lang 2005; 26(2): 131-137
DOI: 10.1055/s-2005-871209
Copyright © 2005 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

A Holistic Approach to Voice Therapy

Joseph C. Stemple1
  • 1Blaine Block Institute for Voice Analysis and Rehabilitation, Dayton, Ohio
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
25 May 2005 (online)

ABSTRACT

Therapy approaches designed to improve the disordered voice may be equally effective when used to enhance the normal voice. A holistic approach to voice therapy is based on a continuum of voice wellness from the disordered voice to the elite voice of the healthy performer. Individuals take charge of the wellness of their voices by following good principles of vocal hygiene and exercising the vocal mechanism in a healthful manner. All voices may be improved on this continuum toward the ideal. When voice therapy techniques attend to the three subsystems of voice production, respiration, and phonation and resonance, the techniques fall into the category of holistic voice therapies. Vocal Function Exercises is one holistic voice therapy approach that has been found to be effective in improving those with voice disorders and enhancing the normal voice. This article introduces the concept of holistic voice therapy and describes the specific Vocal Function Exercise Program.

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Joseph C Stemple, Ph.D. 

369 West First Street #408, Dayton, OH 45402

Email: jstemple@dhns.net