Int J Sports Med 2004; 25(6): 450-456
DOI: 10.1055/s-2004-820939
Physiology & Biochemistry

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Fatigue and Recovery After High-Intensity Exercise Part I: Neuromuscular Fatigue

G. Lattier1 , G. Y. Millet1 , A. Martin1 , V. Martin1
  • 1Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France
Further Information

Publication History

Accepted after revision: October 15, 2003

Publication Date:
02 September 2004 (online)

Abstract

The contribution of central and peripheral factors to muscle fatigue were quantified following a high-intensity uphill running exercise. Eight male volunteers performed an intermittent exercise at 120 % of maximal aerobic speed on a treadmill with an 18 % grade. Electrically evoked and voluntary contractions of the knee extensors and EMG of the two vastii were analyzed before and immediately after the high-intensity exercise. Isometric maximal voluntary contraction decreased slightly (- 7 ± 8 %; p < 0.05) after exercise but no changes were found in the level of maximal activation or in the torque produced by a 80 Hz maximal stimulation applied to the femoral nerve. Following exercise, the single twitch was characterized by lower peak torque, maximal rate of force development, and relaxation (- 28 ± 11 %, - 25 ± 12 %, - 31 ± 15 % respectively, p < 0.001), and higher surface of the M-wave for both vastii. The ratio between the torques evoked by 20 Hz and 80 Hz stimulation declined significantly (- 22 ± 10 %, p < 0.01) after exercise. These findings indicate that muscle fatigue after high-intensity running exercise is due to significant alteration in excitation-contraction coupling and that this type of exercise does not induce significant central fatigue or changes at the crossbridge level.

References

G. Lattier

Faculty of Sports Sciences · University of Burgundy

BP 27877

21078 Dijon Cedex

France

Phone: + 33380396762

Fax: + 33 3 80 39 67 02

Email: [email protected]