Perspectives in Vascular Surgery 2000; Volume 13(Number 3): 0027-0038
DOI: 10.1055/s-2000-9519
Copyright © 2000 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA. Tel. +1(212)584-4662.

Claudication in the Young Patient

Richard T. Krug, Keith D. Calligaro, Matthew J. Dougherty
  • Fellow, Section of Vascular Surgery, Pennsylvania Hospital (RTK); Chief, Section of Vascular Surgery, Pennsylvania Hospital; Associate Clinical Professor, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (KDC); Section of Vascular Surgery, Pennsylvania Hospital; Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (MJD).
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Publikationsdatum:
31. Dezember 2000 (online)

ABSTRACT

-In young patients, generally defined as those under 40 years of age, intermittent claudication (IC) is relatively rare and represents a different spectrum of pathology from IC in older patients. Atherosclerosis in older patients is the most common etiology, but appears to represent a distinct clinical entity with a more virulent course. Furthermore, other causes of lower extremity ischemia play a more prominent role in young patients. These include: (1) popliteal artery entrapment syndrome; (2) traumatic occlusion; (3) adventitial cystic disease; (4) exercise induced compartment syndrome; (5) repetitive trauma; (6) congenital arterial anomalies; and (7) ergotism. We outline the important features of the various causes of (IC) in the young and review the facets of diagnosis and management of these patients.

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