CC BY 4.0 · Arch Plast Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-1779474
Communication

Starting from Scratch: Experiences from Developing the First Vascular Anastomotic Training Program in North Macedonia Using the Porcine Thigh as a Simulation Model

1   Plastic and Maxillofacial Department, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden
,
2   Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Skopje, North Macedonia
,
2   Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Skopje, North Macedonia
,
2   Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Skopje, North Macedonia
,
2   Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Skopje, North Macedonia
3   Faculty of Medicine, University Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Skopje, North Macedonia
,
2   Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Skopje, North Macedonia
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Microsurgical reconstruction constitutes a fundamental part of plastic and reconstructive surgery. It demands high dexterity and intricate technical skills. Its steep learning curve benefits from thorough training throughout residency, where using realistic simulation models in the appropriate sequence of complexity progression is essential in ensuring patient safety prior to progressing to a clinical setting. Commencing training on microvascular-like small diameter vessels could prove unsuitable and ineffective for inexperienced surgeons, however, the larger diameter neurovascular structures in the porcine thigh can provide excellent anastomotic training without compromising the animal tissue training sought after by residents. We present the results from implementing the first vascular anastomotic course in our country, where reconstructive theory was combined with simulated anastomotic training on the porcine thigh. Junior plastic surgery residents described acquiring comprehensive knowledge of reconstructive techniques and could successfully complete anastomoses, despite none to minimal previous experience. Using the porcine thigh should be encouraged as a start-up vascular anastomotic training tool as it provides realistic conditions and tissue handling training, and could improve quality of further training on microvascular structures.

Authors' Contributions

E.O.F.D.: Methodology, Supervision, Visualization, Writing—original draft preparation, review and editing


G.G.: Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Writing—review and editing


B.S.: Writing—original draft preparation, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Resources


B.D.: Project administration, Supervision, Validation, Writing—review and editing


G.S.: Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Supervision, Validation, Writing—review and editing


S.P.: Conceptualization, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Writing—review and editing


Ethical Approval

The study was performed in accordance with local regulations and in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki.


Patient Consent

Not applicable.




Publication History

Received: 01 March 2023

Accepted: 28 December 2023

Article published online:
04 April 2024

© 2024. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, permitting unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction so long as the original work is properly cited. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

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