CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Ultrasound Int Open 2018; 04(01): E23-E29
DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-102013
Original Article
Eigentümer und Copyright ©Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2018

Reference Values for Shear Wave Elastography of Neck and Shoulder Muscles in Healthy Individuals

Caroline Ewertsen
1  Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen OE, Denmark
,
Jonathan Carlsen
2  Rigshospitalet, Radiologisk klinik, Kopenhagen, Denmark
,
Mohammed Aftab Perveez
3  Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Headache Diagnostic Laboratory, Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark
,
Henrik Schytz
3  Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Headache Diagnostic Laboratory, Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 14 April 2017
revised 25 October 2017

accepted 09 January 2018

Publication Date:
04 April 2018 (online)

Abstract

Purpose to establish reference values for ultrasound shear-wave elastography for pericranial muscles in healthy individuals (m. trapezius, m. splenius capitis, m. semispinalis capitis, m. sternocleidomastoideus and m. masseter). Also to evaluate day-to-day variations in the shear-wave speeds and evaluate the effect of the pennation of the muscle fibers, ie scanning parallel or perpendicularly to the fibers.

Materials and Methods 10 healthy individuals (5 males and 5 females) had their pericranial muscles examined with shear-wave elastography in two orthogonal planes on two different days for their dominant and non-dominant side. Mean shear wave speeds from 5 ROI’s in each muscle, for each scan plane for the dominant and non-dominant side for the two days were calculated. The effect of the different parameters – muscle pennation, gender, dominant vs non-dominant side and day was evaluated.

Results The effect of scan plane in relation to muscle pennation was statistically significant (p<0.0001). The mean shear-wave speed when scanning parallel to the muscle fibers was significantly higher than the mean shear-wave speed when scanning perpendicularly to the fibers. The day-to-day variation was statistically significant (p=0.0258), but not clinically relevant. Shear-wave speeds differed significantly between muscles. Mean shear wave speeds (m/s) for the muscles in the parallel plane were: for masseter 2.45 (SD:+/−0.25), semispinal 3.36 (SD:+/−0.75), splenius 3.04 (SD:+/−0.65), sternocleidomastoid 2.75 (SD:+/−0.23), trapezius 3.20 (SD:+/−0.27) and trapezius lateral 3.87 (SD:+/−3.87).

Conclusion The shear wave speed variation depended on the direction of scanning. Shear wave elastography may be a method to evaluate muscle stiffness in patients suffering from chronic neck pain.