Int J Sports Med 2018; 39(05): 327-342
DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-101149
Review
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Efficacy of Exercise on Breast Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Preclinical Data

Ana Cristina Corrêa Figueira
1  CIAFEL, Research Center in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
2  Department of Sciences and Technologies/Sport Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Setúbal, Setúbal, Portugal
,
António Cortinhas
3  Department of Sport Sciences Exercise and Health, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
,
Jorge Pinto Soares
3  Department of Sport Sciences Exercise and Health, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
4  CIDESD, Research Center in Sports, Health Sciences and Human, Portugal
,
José Carlos Leitão
3  Department of Sport Sciences Exercise and Health, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
4  CIDESD, Research Center in Sports, Health Sciences and Human, Portugal
,
Rita Pinho Ferreira
5  QOPNA, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
,
Jose Alberto Duarte
1  CIAFEL, Research Center in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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Publikationsverlauf



accepted 08. Januar 2018

Publikationsdatum:
21. März 2018 (online)

Abstract

The use of preclinical models to investigate antitumor effects of exercise on breast tumor (BT) development and progression are critical. However, published results have not been quantitatively summarized or examined for potential exercise-moderating variables. We conducted this review to summarize and quantify the effect-size of exercise on BT outcomes in preclinical studies. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Science and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (SIGLE) databases. Risk of bias was assessed using SYRCLE’s RoB tool. A total of 116 correlations were performed to analyze 28 preclinical studies published through December 2016, which included 2,085 animals and 51 exercise programs. Positive effects of small, medium and large magnitude were observed in tumor incidence, growth and multiplicity, respectively. In the tumor microenvironment, positive effects of large magnitude were also observed in proliferation and apoptosis but not in angiogenesis. Moderator variables correlated with higher intervention effects were identified along with a considerable heterogeneity in exercise protocols that precluded us from clearly perceiving the benefits of exercise exposure. In conclusion, exercise performed under specific conditions benefits BT outcomes. Preclinical studies with exercise designs mimicking exercise exposure that can be used in clinical contexts are needed.

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