Int J Sports Med 2018; 39(05): 382-389
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-125447
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Resistance Training Threshold for Elevating Bone Mineral Density in Growing Female Rats

Azriel D. Dror
1  Department of Health Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, United States
,
Katie Virk
1  Department of Health Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, United States
,
Kassandra Lee
1  Department of Health Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, United States
,
Aaron Gerston
1  Department of Health Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, United States
,
Anuradha Prakash
2  Schmid College of Sci, Chapman University, Orange, United States
,
Marcia J. Abbott
1  Department of Health Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, United States
,
S. Victoria Jaque
3  Northridge, Dept of Kinesiology, California State University, Northridge, United States
,
Ken D. Sumida
1  Department of Health Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted 10 December 2017

Publication Date:
23 February 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum amount of resistance exercise that would stimulate bone formation yielding an elevation in bone mineral density (BMD) during the growth period in female rats. Female rats were randomly divided into: Control (Con, n=8), 3 ladder climb resistance-trained group (3LC, n=8), 4 ladder climb resistance-trained group (4LC, n=8), 5 ladder climb resistance-trained group (5LC, n=8), and 6 ladder climb resistance-trained group (6LC, n=8). All exercised groups were conditioned to climb a vertical ladder with weights appended to their tail 3 days/wk for a total of 6 wks. After 6 wks, left tibia BMD (g/cm2) was significantly greater for 4LC (0.197±0.003), 5LC (0.200±0.004) and 6LC (0.202±0.003) when compared to Con (0.185±0.006). Left femur BMD (g/cm2) was significantly greater for 4LC (0.260±0.005), 5LC (0.269±0.004) and 6LC (0.272±0.006) when compared to Con (0.244±0.006). There were no significant differences in tibia and femur BMD between 4LC, 5LC, and 6LC groups. The results suggest that during growth, a high volume of resistance exercise was required to elicit an elevation in BMD in females.