CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Endosc Int Open 2018; 06(03): E335-E339
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-124470
Case report
Owner and Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2018

Effectiveness and safety of endoscopic radial incision and cutting for severe benign anastomotic stenosis after surgery for colorectal carcinoma: a three-case series

Naoki Asayama
Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
,
Shinji Nagata
Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
,
Kenjiro Shigita
Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
,
Taiki Aoyama
Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
,
Akira Fukumoto
Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
,
Shinichi Mukai
Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted 04 September 2017

accepted after revision 25 October 2017

Publication Date:
07 March 2018 (online)

Abstract

Benign colonic anastomotic stenosis sometimes occurs after surgical resection and usually requires surgical or endoscopic dilation. Limited data are available on the effectiveness and safety of the endoscopic radial incision and cutting (RIC) method at sites other than the esophagus. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of RIC dilation for severe benign anastomotic colonic stenosis. Subjects were 3 men (median age 72 years, range 65 – 76 years) who developed severe benign anastomotic stenosis after surgical resection for colorectal carcinoma and were subsequently treated by RIC dilation at Hiroshima City Asa Citizens Hospital between May 2014 and December 2016. Severe anastomotic stenosis was defined as a narrowed anastomosis through which a standard colonoscope could not be passed. The median interval from surgery to RIC was 21 months (range 9 – 29 months). RIC was successful in all 3 patients and reduced the severity of dyschezia postoperatively; 2 patients experienced improvement after a single RIC session and the other after 6 RIC sessions. No treatment-related adverse events or re-stenosis requiring repeat dilation was noted during a median follow-up of 27 months (range 8 – 37 months). Our findings indicate that the RIC technique can be applied safely and effectively to various sites in the colon, avoiding the need for reoperation.