Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2018; 126(09): 570-576
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-120570
Article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Prevalence and Progression Rate of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Correlation with the Duration of Diabetes

Margarete Voigt
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Sebastian Schmidt
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Thomas Lehmann
3   Department of Medical Statistics, University Hospital Jena, Information and Documentation, Jena, Germany
,
Benjamin Köhler
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Christof Kloos
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Ulrich A. Voigt
2   Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Daniel Meller
2   Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Gunter Wolf
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Ulrich A. Müller
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
,
Nicolle Müller
1   Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 07 June 2017
revised13 August 2017

accepted 29 September 2017

Publication Date:
28 November 2017 (online)

Abstract

Aims We examined prevalence and progression of retinopathy in dependence on diabetes duration in order to estimate the probability of progression.

Patients/Methods In a retrospective cohort-analysis from an academic outpatient department of endocrinology and metabolic diseases we analyzed 17461 consultations of 4513 patients with DM2 from 1987 to 2014. 50.3% of the patients (n=2272) had at least one documented result of funduscopy.

Results 25.8% of the patients had retinopathy (20.2% non-proliferative, 4.7% proliferative, 0.7% were not classified, 0.1% blindness). The prevalence of retinopathy in dependence on diabetes duration was 1.1% at diagnosis, 6.6% after 0<5 years, 12% after 5<10 years, 24% after 10<15 years, 39.9% after 15<20 years, 52.7% after 20<25 years, 58.7% after 25<30 years and 63% after ≥30 years. In a subset of 586 (25.7%) patients with retinal photography of 3 consecutive years 7.0% showed deterioration after one and 12.2% after two years; 2.6% improved after one and 2.8% after two years. 201 (34.3%) of this group had<10 years diabetes and lower deterioration (4.5% worsened after one and 9.5% after two years). Their retinopathy mainly transformed from no retinopathy to non-proliferative. Four patients (2.0%) developed proliferative retinopathy.

Conclusions/Interpretations Within the first 10 years of diabetes duration, the prevalence of retinopathy is low and the progression infrequent. Most patients have a non-proliferative form which can be reversible and rarely requires interventions. Patients with DM2 without retinopathy and good glycaemic control do not run into additional risk from expanding funduscopy intervals to biennial.

Supplementary Material