Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2018; 126(04): 205-212
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-119352
Article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The Effects of a Modified High-carbohydrate High-fat Diet on Metabolic Syndrome Parameters in Male Rats

Sok Kuan Wong
1  Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaakob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
,
Kok-Yong Chin
1  Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaakob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
,
Farihah Hj Suhaimi
2  Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaakob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
,
Fairus Ahmad
2  Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaakob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
,
Soelaiman Ima-Nirwana
1  Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaakob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 14 June 2017
revised 10 August 2017

accepted 06 September 2017

Publication Date:
08 November 2017 (online)

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including central obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. A previous study has established that high-carbohydrate high-fat diet (HCHF) can induce MetS in rats. In this study, we modified components of the diet so that it resembled the diet of Southeast Asians. This study aimed to determine the effects of this modified HCHF diet on metabolic parameters in rats. Male Wistar rats (n=14) were randomised into two groups. The normal group was given standard rat chow. The MetS group was given the HCHF diet, comprises of fructose, sweetened condensed milk, ghee, Hubble Mendel and Wakeman salt mixture, and powdered rat food. The diet regimen was assigned for a period of 16 weeks. Metabolic syndrome parameters (abdominal circumference, blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid profile) were measured at week 0, 8, 12, and 16 of the study. The measurement of whole body composition (fat mass, lean mass, and percentage of fat) was performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at week 0, 8, and 16. Our results indicated that the components of MetS were partially developed after 8 weeks of HCHF diet. Systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, fat content, and percentage of fat was significantly higher in the HCHF group compared to normal group (p<0.05). After 12 weeks of HCHF diet, the rats showed significant increases in abdominal circumference, blood pressure, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia compared to normal control (p<0.05). In conclusion, MetS is successfully established in male rats induced by the modified HCHF diet after 12 weeks.