Int J Sports Med 2017; 38(11): 803-808
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-115735
Physiology & Biochemistry
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Sciatic Nerve Conductivity is Impaired by Hamstring Strain Injuries

Karina Kouzaki
1  Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Koichi Nakazato
1  Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Masuhiko Mizuno
1  Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Tooru Yonechi
1  Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Yusuke Higo
2  Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Yoshiaki Kubo
3  Department of Judotheraphy, Tokyo Ariake University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Tokuyoshi Kono
1  Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
,
Kenji Hiranuma
1  Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 07 June 2017

Publication Date:
11 September 2017 (online)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess sciatic nerve conductivity in athletes with a history of hamstring strain injuries. Twenty-seven athletes with a history of hamstring strain injuries were included in the injured group. The control group consisted of 16 uninjured participants. We measured the proximal and distal latencies and calculated the sciatic nerve conduction velocity to evaluate neuronal conductivity. The results were expressed as median values and interquartile ranges. Both proximal latency and distal latency of the injured limb in the injured group were significantly longer than those of the uninjured limb (p<0.05). The nerve conduction velocity of the injured limb in the injured group was significantly lower than that of the uninjured limb (p<0.05). There were no significant side-to-side differences in the control group. Sciatic nerve conductivity impairments may exist in athletes with a history of hamstring strain injuries.