Int J Sports Med 2017; 38(06): 439-446
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-101909
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Validity and Reliability of the Garmin Vector Power Meter in Laboratory and Field Cycling

Alfred Nimmerichter
1  Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Wiener Neustadt, Austria
,
Lukas Schnitzer
1  Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Wiener Neustadt, Austria
,
Bernhard Prinz
1  Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Wiener Neustadt, Austria
,
Dieter Simon
1  Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Wiener Neustadt, Austria
,
Klaus Wirth
1  Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Wiener Neustadt, Austria
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 12 January 2017

Publication Date:
01 May 2017 (online)

Abstract

To assess the validity and reliability of the Garmin Vector against the SRM power meter, 6 cyclists completed 3 continuous trials at power outputs from 100–300 W at 50–90 rev·min−1 and a 5-min time trial in laboratory and field conditions. In field conditions only, a 30-s sprint was performed. Data were compared with paired samples t-tests, with the 95% limits of agreement (LoA) and the typical error. Reliability was calculated as the coefficient of variation (CV). There was no significant difference between the devices in power output in laboratory (p=0.245) and field conditions (p=0.312). 1-s peak power was significantly different between the devices (p=0.043). The LoA were ~1.0±5.0 W and ~0.5±0.5 rev·min−1 in both conditions. The LoA during the 30-s sprint was 6.3±38.9 W and for 1-s peak power it was 18.8±17.1 W. The typical error for power output was 2.9%, while during sprint cycling it was 7.4% for 30-s and 2.7% for 1-s peak power. For cadence, the typical error was below 1.0%. The mean CVs were ~1.0% and ~3.0% for the SRM and Garmin, respectively. These findings suggest, that the Garmin Vector is a valid alternative for training. However, during sprint cycling there is lower agreement with the SRM power meter. Both devices provide good reliability (CV<3.0%).