CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Asian J Neurosurg 2022; 17(04): 577-583
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1758846
Original Article

Outcome of Surgical Treatment for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

Syed Muhammad Maroof Hashmi
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
,
Ibrahim Hammoud
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
,
Pranaw Kumar
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
,
Afaq Ali Sartaj
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
,
Kaushik Ghosh
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
,
Arupratan Ray
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
,
Aprajay Golash
1   Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire, United Kingdom
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Objective The spinal column is one of the most prevalent regions for metastasis, with an increasing frequency of spinal metastases. Spinal cord metastatic tumor damages the vertebral body, weakens the spinal support, and exerts mass effect on the spinal cord. Overzealous surgical intervention does not provide any additional benefit in most of the spinal metastasis due to shorter life expectancy. The principal goal of this study is to analyze the outcome of various surgical treatments offered to patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC).

Methods Retrospective cohort study including all patients that underwent surgical intervention for MSCC from March 2013 to March 2020.

Results A total of 198 patients were included, 113 males and 85 females; the mean age was 62 years. The most common primary cancer was prostate (21.71%) followed by hematological (20.07%) and lung (16.66%). At 6-month postsurgery, 68.68% of patients were Frankel grade D or E (vs. 23.23% preoperatively), 16.6% were grade C (vs 57% preoperatively), and 14.64% were grade A or B (vs. 19.69% preoperatively). Pain on numeric rating scale was decreased from 6.38 ± 3.08 to 3.39 ± 0.73 at 24 hours postsurgery and 1.94 ± 0.67 at 6 months.

Conclusion This study found that the majority of patients, undergoing minimally invasive spinal stabilization and decompression for metastatic spinal tumors, have better quality of life, analgesia, and mobility. In conclusion, treatment for spinal metastases should be individualized and a multidisciplinary approach is needed.

Authors' Contributions

S.M.M.H., I.H., P.K., and A.A.S. conceived and designed the study. K.G., A.R., and A.G. were involved in planning and supervised the work. S.M.M.H., I.H., and A.A.S collected the data, and S.M.M.H., I.H., P.K., and A.A.S. performed the analysis, drafted the manuscript, and designed the figures. P.K. and A.A.S. aided in interpreting the results and S.M.M.H. and I.H. worked on the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript and approved the version to be published.


Ethical Approval

This research study was conducted retrospectively from data obtained for clinical purposes. This retrospective was in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.




Publication History

Article published online:
10 December 2022

© 2022. Asian Congress of Neurological Surgeons. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

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