CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology 2022; 06(02): 082-086
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1758040
Original Article

Outcomes of Percutaneous Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters Insertion by Interventional Radiologists: A Single-Institution Experience

Khadijah Alhussaini
1   Vascular Interventional Radiology Section, Medical Imaging Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
1   Vascular Interventional Radiology Section, Medical Imaging Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
Abdulaziz Mohammad Al-Sharydah
2   Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, King Fahd Hospital of the University, Khobar City, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia
,
3   Nephrology Section, Department of Internal Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
,
1   Vascular Interventional Radiology Section, Medical Imaging Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, and not-for-profit sectors.

Abstract

Objectives This article evaluates the short- and long-term outcomes of percutaneous peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters inserted by interventional radiology service and analyzes the factors that affect the sustainability of patent and functional PD catheters.

Materials and Methods Retrospective single-institution study between April 2015 and February 2021. A total of 131 patients (75 males) were enrolled with mean age of 50 ± 19.6 years with an average body mass index (BMI) of 28 ± 7 kg/m2. Technical and clinical success were evaluated. Catheter-related complications were classified into mechanical and nonmechanical categories, including infectious complications. Indications for removal were analyzed.

Results Technical and clinical success were 100%. The average dwelling time for the entire cohort was 497.5 ± 462.3 days. Forty-six patients (35%) were on PD at the last follow-up with an average dwelling time of 492 days. PD-related complications were reported in 79/131 (60.3%) patients, including peritonitis (40.46%; 53/131), followed by malposition/migration (12.21%; 16/131), tunnel/exit site infection (10.69%; 14/131), and dysfunction (12.21%; 16/131). The incidence of peritonitis within 30 days postinsertion was 9.43% (5/53). The average interval between insertion and migration was 100.5 ± 144.8 days (95% confidence interval, 6.9–14.4). There was a trend for a higher rate of malposition/migration in patients with higher BMI (p = 0.0561). Causes for PD catheters removal were: (1) infection-related (24.4%; 32/131), (2) renal transplant recipients (16%; 21/131), (3) mechanical complications (13.7%; 18/131), and (4) patient's preference (7.6%; 10/131).

Conclusion Percutaneous PD catheter placement by interventional radiologists provides acceptable long-term outcomes and complication rates that meet the recommended standards.

Ethical Approval and Consent to Participate

The article, in its entirety and detail, does not include disclosing the identity of individuals or information indicating them. This medical/educational report is intended to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge and does not represent the development, testing. Given the purely descriptive and retrospective nature of the study, and in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration, informed consent was waived.


Availability of Data and Materials

The principal investigator is responsible for sharing the study-related data publicly upon reasonable request from the publishing journal.


Authors' Contributions

All authors conducted all aspects of this study and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work that has been reported in the article.




Publication History

Article published online:
14 November 2022

© 2022. The Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

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