Thromb Haemost 2022; 122(11): 1943-1947
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1751280
Letter to the Editor

Bacterial-Type Long-Chain Polyphosphates Bind Human Proteins in the Phosphatidylinositol Signaling Pathway

Viola Krenzlin*
1   Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Julian Roewe*
1   Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Marcel Strueve*
1   Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
María Martínez-Negro
2   Department of Physical Chemistry of Polymers, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany
,
Arjun Sharma
1   Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
3   Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
1   Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
Svenja Morsbach
2   Department of Physical Chemistry of Polymers, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany
,
1   Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
3   Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was supported by financial resources obtained from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (01EO1503 to M.B.), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (BO3482/3–3, BO3482/4–1 to M.B.), and the National Institutes of Health (R01AI153613 to M.B.). C.R. was awarded a Fellowship of the Gutenberg Research College at the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz.

Introduction

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Inorganic polyphosphates are linear polymers of monophosphate residues (Pi) that exist as short chains (Pi30–120) in platelet δ-granules and as long chains in bacteria.[1] A higher chain length increases the activity of these anionic polymers to accelerate factor XIIa-mediated factor XI activation, thrombin generation, block tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity, and strengthen fibrin clots by enhancing their mechanical stability and resistance to fibrinolysis.[2] [3] In bacteria, polyphosphates are associated with energy and phosphate storage, stress resistance, chelation of metal ions, and escaping host immunity.[4] During severe infections, long-chain polyphosphates from bacteria contribute to coagulopathy, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and vascular-endothelial dysfunction.[3] [5] [6] However, the mechanisms that convey the pleiotropic activities of polyphosphates in living cells remain understudied.

* These authors contributed equally.




Publication History

Received: 10 December 2021

Accepted: 17 May 2022

Article published online:
30 July 2022

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