CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Lab Physicians 2022; 14(03): 369-372
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742415
Brief Report

SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antigen Detection in Respiratory and Nonrespiratory Specimens in COVID-19 Patients

Vandana Vijayeta Kiro
1   Department of Microbiology, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center (JPNATC), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Parul Singh
1   Department of Microbiology, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center (JPNATC), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
2   Junior Research Fellow Program, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center (JPNATC), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Richa Aggarwal
3   Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences IIMS, New Delhi, India
,
Kapil Dev Soni
3   Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences IIMS, New Delhi, India
,
Yudhyavir Singh
3   Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences IIMS, New Delhi, India
,
Abhishek Singh
3   Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences IIMS, New Delhi, India
,
Anjan Trikha
3   Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences IIMS, New Delhi, India
,
Purva Mathur
4   Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center (JPNATC), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
› Institutsangaben
Funding No external funding was received.

Abstract

Rapid antigen testing for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) available at present provides immediate results at low cost with less expertise and without any need of sophisticated infrastructure. Most of these test kits available are for nasopharyngeal samples. This is a novel study to detect the presence of COVID antigen in samples other than throat and oropharyngeal. Various samples received from patients admitted in the COVID-19 dedicated center were tested for the presence of antigen. Same procedure was followed as done for the nasopharyngeal sample. A total of 150 samples were tested, which included ascitic fluid, pleural fluid, drain fluid, bile, bronchoalveolar lavage, cerebrospinal fluid, endotracheal tube aspirate, sputum, tissue, and urine. Out of 150, 11 (7.33%) were positive and 138 (92.66%) were negative for the antigen test. The COVID-19 antigen test kit, though designed for nasopharyngeal samples, was able to detect the presence of antigen in other clinical samples.



Publikationsverlauf

Artikel online veröffentlicht:
09. Februar 2022

© 2022. The Indian Association of Laboratory Physicians. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

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