Endoscopy 2016; 48(12): 1096-1101
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-115938
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Radiofrequency ablation for the management of occluded biliary metal stents

Abdurrahman Kadayifci
1  Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
2  Division of Gastroenterology, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey
,
Mustafa Atar
1  Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
,
David G. Forcione
1  Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
,
Brenna W. Casey
1  Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
,
Peter B. Kelsey
1  Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
,
William R. Brugge
1  Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted 09 November 2015

accepted after revision 04 July 2016

Publication Date:
07 October 2016 (eFirst)

Background and study aim: Obstruction of biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) is seen frequently. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) causes tissue necrosis. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of RFA for management of occluded SEMS.

Patients and methods: Patients with biliary malignancy and treated for an occluded SEMS were retrospectively reviewed. The study group comprised patients treated with RFA using an Habib endoprobe inside the SEMS. The control group comprised patients treated only with insertion of a plastic stent into an occluded SEMS. The end points were; 90-day stent patency rate, time to stent reocclusion, 30-day mortality, and 3 – and 6-month survival rates.

Results: During the 5-year study period 25 patients with an occluded SEMS underwent RFA and 25 patients underwent a plastic stent placement only. Both groups were matched for age and diagnosis. Immediate biliary drainage was restored in all patients. In the RFA group, the stenosis was ablated successfully in 14 patients (56 %); ablation failed in 11 and a plastic stent was then inserted into the SEMS for these. The control group had only placement of a plastic stent across the stenosis. Stent patency rate at 90 days was 56 % and 24 % in the RFA and control groups, respectively (P = 0.04). The mean stent patency time was significantly longer in the RFA group compared to the control group (119.5 vs. 65.3 days, P = 0.03).

Conclusion: The application of RFA for occluded SEMS improves stent patency. RFA is an alternative treatment of tissue ingrowth in malignant biliary obstruction.