Planta Med 2017; 83(03/04): 232-238
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-111825
Biological and Pharmacological Activity
Original Papers
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The Plant-Derived Naphthoquinone Droserone Inhibits In Vitro Measles Virus Infection

Christina Lieberherr*
1  Institute for Virology and Immunobiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Guoliang Zhang*
2  Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
3  Present address: Shanghai Huilun Life Science & Technology Co., Ltd., Shanghai, P. R. China
,
Anika Grafen
1  Institute for Virology and Immunobiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Katrin Singethan
1  Institute for Virology and Immunobiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
4  Present address: Institute for Virology, München, Germany
,
Sabine Kendl
1  Institute for Virology and Immunobiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Valentin Vogt
1  Institute for Virology and Immunobiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Jonathan Maier
2  Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Gerhard Bringmann
2  Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
,
Jürgen Schneider-Schaulies
1  Institute for Virology and Immunobiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 11 January 2016
revised 22 June 2016

accepted 02 July 2016

Publication Date:
15 July 2016 (eFirst)

Abstract

The naphthoquinone droserone (1) is a natural product occurring in dicotyledonous plants. We have now observed that the addition of 1 during infection of tissue culture cells with measles virus considerably reduced the infection. Interestingly, the infection was inhibited only when droserone (1) was added during virus entry, but not when added to the cells prior to virus uptake or after virus uptake. These findings suggest that 1 interacts with viral particles to reduce infectivity. The formation of progeny measles virus particles was inhibited to 50 % by droserone (1) at a concentration (IC50) of approximately 2 µM with a half-maximal cytotoxicity (CC50) of about 60 µM for Vero cells. Other tested naphthoquinone derivatives, among them the likewise natural plumbagin (2), but also synthetic analogs, were either more cytotoxic or not as effective as 1. Thus, our data do not support the development of naphthoquinone derivatives into antiviral compounds, but suggest that they may be interesting research tools to study measles virus entry into cells.

* These authors contributed equally to this manuscript.


Supporting Information