Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2022; 35(03): 157-165
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1742248
Original Research

Characterization of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy in Cats and Association with Clinicopathological Parameters at Presentation

Ursina Gustin
1   Division of Emergency and Critical Care, Department for Small Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
,
1   Division of Emergency and Critical Care, Department for Small Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
,
Benjamin M. Muri
2   Department for Small Animals, Clinic for Small Animal Surgery, Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
,
Irina Spring
3   Department for Small Animals, Clinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
,
Rahel Jud Schefer
1   Division of Emergency and Critical Care, Department for Small Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was partly funded by the Small Animal Foundation of the Vetsuisse Faculty (Intern salary and ROTEM material), the Swiss Association for Small Animal Medicine (SVK) (Intern salary) and Axonlab AG (discount on ROTEM material).

Abstract

Objective This study aimed to document rotational thromboelastometric (ROTEM) characteristics of traumatized cats and to investigate associations between clinicopathological parameters and acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). A secondary goal was to determine the relevance of autoheparinization in injured cats.

Study Design Cats presenting with acute (<12 hours) trauma were eligible. Cats were allocated to the ATC group (≥2 hypocoagulable parameters) or non-ATC group (≤1 hypocoagulable parameter) based on ROTEM analysis. Clinicopathological parameters were compared between groups and regression was used to find variables associated with ATC. Heparinase-modified ROTEM (HepTEM) was used to assess for heparin effects in a subgroup.

Results Fifty-three cats were included, and the incidence of ATC was 15%. Prolongation of both intrinsic and extrinsic clotting times (CT) was the most frequently altered ROTEM variable in the ATC group, but CTInTEM-prolongation also occurred in 47% of non-ATC cats. The incidence of autoheparinization, defined as concurrent CTInTEM prolongation and CTInTEM:HepTEM ratio >1.1, was 41% and was observed in both cats with and without ATC. None of the evaluated clinicopathological parameters were different between groups or associated with ATC.

Conclusion Acute traumatic coagulopathy in cats is mainly characterized by prolonged CT. No relationship between clinicopathological variables and ATC was identified and prediction of ATC based on these variables was not possible. While autoheparinization is important in cats, it is not the sole cause for ATC.

Authors' Contribution

U.G. was the primary investigator, adapted the study concept and design, performed data collection, data analysis and statistical analysis and wrote the manuscript. N.S. and R.J.S. were supervising U.G. and were responsible for setup of the study concept and design, helped with data collection, helped with statistical evaluation (N.S.) and critical review of the manuscript. I.S. and B.M. helped with study design and data collection as well as data analysis and critically reviewed the manuscript. All authors agree to be publicly accountable for the content of the manuscript.




Publication History

Received: 11 February 2021

Accepted: 09 December 2021

Article published online:
11 February 2022

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